Results for: "lunch 2.0"

Shizzow knows Portland, Oregon. Now get to know Shizzow.

ShizzowSharing information about your current location with people you trust has always held this glimmer of potential. The glimmer of actually finding the time to meet face-to-face during our ever increasingly busy schedules. The glimmer of that impromptu meetup with people whom you would like to get to know better.

To date, that potential has always remained a glimmer.

The reality? That’s been slightly less beneficial. Reality has tended to be a useless stream of updates, declaring your friends are “in Portland, Oregon” or, worse yet, at some random address that holds little to no meaning.

Introducing Shizzow

And that’s why I’m so glad to see Portland-centric Shizzow opening its private beta, today.

What’s Shizzow?

Shizzow provides the technology for you to notify your friends of your location, with as little effort as possible, so you can spend more time hanging out with your peeps and less time trying to coordinate bringing them together through phone, email, SMS and IM.

I hear you. “Another one?” But hold your horses. I think Shizzow’s got a number of things going for it. And, as far as Portland goes? I think Shizzow has nailed it.

First and foremost, Shizzow is for Portland, Oregon. And only Portland, Oregon. Not the world. Not the Northwest. Portland. And that’s it. Shizzow isn’t about the video-game mentality of adding as many followers as possible—followers you may never ever meet in person. Shizzow is about knowing where your friends in Portland are. So that you can meet them, face-to-face, when those opportunities avail themselves.

Simple and local. By Portland, for Portland. And in my book, that’s huge.

Second, Shizzow is designed to understand where you are—and to tell people where you are—as simply and easily as possible. And I’ve been duly impressed by how hard they’ve worked to make sure that the database of locations is as deep and intuitive as possible.

Why is that important? Two reasons:

  1. No more (or far less) “Please enter the address of your location.” When you “shout” with Shizzow, you just need to know the name of the Portland place in which you’re currently standing. Not the address. Not the GPS coordinates. The name of the place. Easy.
  2. I know places better than addresses. When I’m reading the shouts of my Shizzow friends, it’s a lot (a lot!) easier for me to process “EcoTrust Building” than it is for me to process “721 NW 9th Avenue Portland, OR 97209.” That means, that I’m more likely to go meet my friends or plan my trips accordingly.

Sounds good, huh? I know! So let’s get you involved in this private beta.

Beta invites available

Dawn Foster has been helping Shizzow with its community, so if you’re in the Portland area and interested in an invite, she’s the best person to ping… but you better hurry:

Right now, the beta invites are limited to a couple hundred people living in Portland. I’ll be sending out invites today along with the rest of the team.

Even now, I’m already happily getting a flood of new friends (thank you!), so I know the Portland gang is getting involved. I can’t wait to see how this works once we get big group shouting.

A true side project to startup story

And the final reason that I’m so happy for these guys? They’ve truly made the leap from side project to startup:

Each member of the Shizzow crew has a full-time job outside of Shizzow, and it’s taken a ton of sweat equity and sleep-deprived nights to bring Shizzow to fruition. But because we’ve believed in our vision and believed in the idea of bringing friends and like-minded people together, the sacrifices we’ve made have not seemed like work but instead like… something we simply had to do. And now, 10 months and tens of thousands of lines of code later, we’re ready…

I can’t really put into words how proud I am of these guys. And how excited I am to get everyone in Portland on this service.

That said, what if you don’t happen to make the initial round of invites? Fear not, gentle reader. There’s still another way to get into shouting with Shizzow. As Dawn says:

If you want an invite, and don’t hear from me today, you can get one from me at Lunch 2.0 on Wednesday.

That’s right! Shizzow will be the guest of honor at the Silicon Florist’s Portland Lunch 2.0, this Wednesday. So come on down to CubeSpace, grab some lunch, meet some people face-to-face, and get signed up with Shizzow, so that you can continue those discussions—and continue getting to know your Portland peers.

Call me evil and conniving, but I’m seriously hoping you don’t get an invite. Because that way I get the chance to see you, in person.

In any case, I’m really, really looking forward to all the shouts from CubeSpace, this Wednesday. And to running into you in person—thanks to Shizzow—in the near future.

 

Shizzow is a location-driven social networking service that encourages quality relationships via face-to-face interaction. Dig in at http://shizzow.com . For more information on the launch and Shizzow’s story, see the Shizzow blog.

Got lunch plans? Why not have “Lunch with a VC” today?

Seems like Silicon Florist has lunch on the brain as of late. What with looking for Portland Lunch 2.0 hosts and hosting a Portland Lunch 2.0 in August. So, clearly, mentioning another lunch or two won’t hurt.

Okay, let’s do that.

If you don’t have any lunch plans today, you might want to take the opportunity to swing by CubeSpace at noon to have “Lunch with a VC.”

Come hang out with Epic Ventures to learn more about VC funding. Bring questions! We’ll have 45 min. of Q&A, then head out to lunch as a group.

Carolynn Duncan of Epic Ventures will host this first-of-many-to-come event as a way of introducing herself to the Portland startup and entrepreneurial community.

Can’t make the lunch? No worries. You can still get to know Carolynn by following her on Twitter or following her blog.

And lunch isn’t all she has in mind. There will be some other capital-related activities that she’ll be kicking off in the near future as well.

For more information or to RSVP, visit Upcoming.

Slow news week? Not really

Given the dearth of posts this week, you’d think nothing had happened in Portland, at all. Or that I simply wasn’t paying attention.

Luckily, neither is true.

As you’ve likely noticed, I’ve been heavy on the link round-ups, this week. And I’ve been holding back some of the major news.

Why? Well, I know folks are taking time off, enjoying the Portland weather, and *gasp* actually getting out from in front of their machines.

The stories will wait. And I want you to around to read them. I’m funny that way. So, they’ll be here next week, when you’re back at your machine and looking for the latest and greatest.

What kind of stories? Well I’m glad you asked.

  • Did you know that the inimitable Gary Vaynerchuk of Wine Library TV was in town, this week? That’s right. And he helped the Legion of Tech launch their first Legion of Talk. That’s news. And, hopefully, when I run the write-up next week, we’ll also have video. Because, honestly, you don’t really get the full effect of Gary unless you get the full effect of Gary.
  • And Portland Web Innovators held their fist Demolicious event, featuring five local developers and their current projects. Not only were all of the projects cool, there’s one in particular that I found so compelling that I thought it deserved a write-up of its own. Which one? You’ll just have to wait and see.
  • Silicon Florist acquired Portland Lunch 2.0, so all of the news and notes about Portland Lunch 2.0 will appear here, from now on. Including the write-up on the latest lunch at Wieden+Kennedy and the next lunch at Souk.
  • As always, there are a couple of top secret stories that may (or may not) break next week. That’s exciting, isn’t it?
  • Oh and that’s not all, my friends. I’m sure there’s some news that I haven’t even learned about yet. Like why were Gary V and Loic Le Meur both in Portland at the same time? Inquiring minds, inquiring minds.

So, take some time off. Relax. Celebrate your independence.

And may you and yours have a safe an happy Fourth of July.

I’m looking forward to posting more next week.

Fast Wonder Dawn Foster launches consulting practice

If you’ve had the opportunity to attend any Portland tech events over the past year or so, it’s highly likely that you’ve come in contact with some of the handiwork of Dawn Foster. Chair of the Legion of Tech and a staunch advocate of the Portland startup tech and unconference scene, Dawn’s influence has been a critical ingredient in BarCamp Portland, Ignite Portland, the Legion of Tech Happy Hours, Portland Lunch 2.0, any number of Jive Software events, Portland is Awesome… the list goes on and on.

And now that Dawn has announced that she’s leaving Jive, some of that magic touch is for hire:

Recently, I’ve seen a number of companies struggling with how to get more savvy about social media and interacting with online communities. My focus will be on providing consulting services to help guide companies in developing a comprehensive social media and community engagement strategy. I will help companies engage with their community both online and offline to help generate buzz around their products. I can also help companies find, monitor, and respond to what others are saying about them online.

No doubt, Dawn’s expertise will be highly sought. I’m looking forward to her continued success on the other side of the desk and would like to, again, congratulate her on this exciting new endeavor.

For more, see Fast Wonder Consulting or for a (now slightly dated) bio, see Dawn Foster on Portland on Fire.

Silicon Florist’s links arrangement for June 03

Veer @ RailsConf 2008 by Yuval Kordov

Yuval Kordov writes “I headed down to Portland last week to check out the happenings at RailsConf 2008. All in all, a good show. Four days of intensive sessions, new ideas, product announcements (woo Rails 2.1!), shmoozing, and frolicking. Thanks to everyone for their involvement, cheers to those we managed to meet up with, and loving kudos to Portland for being such an awesome city.” (Hat tip Bram Pitoyo)

I want to write more. Do more. Hack more. Learn more. So I gotta read less.

Josh Bancroft writes ” read a LOT. I used to be subscribed to over 1500 RSS feeds. That was WAY too many. About a year ago, I cut it down to around 500 feeds or so. But that was around the same time that Twitter really exploded in my life, proving itself invaluable for not only connecting and talking with people, but as the fastest conduit for breaking news, the most efficient source for answers to questions, and general serendipitous gems of things that were interesting and made me smarter. So I think the overall level of information overload stayed about the same. Today, I decided action was needed. Drastic action, maybe. “

The Dixie Chicks can make people more innovative

Gia Lyons writes “The idea of social data portability – ‘the option to use your personal data between trusted applications and vendors’ – has been around for some time now. The DataPortability Project is focused on consumer-oriented sites, and not corporate internal use. The Project people even say so.”

Startup delegation to Greenlight Greater Portland

Nathan Bell writes “Looking at the GGP’s board of directors it appears to be made up of mostly reps from big business. I’m hoping that there will be opportunities tomorrow to expose this group to the great things that the startup community brings to Portland, as well as what Portland can do to bring more great startups here. If you have any opinions on the matter, or questions you want fished around let me or anyone else on the delegation know.”

Portland Lunch 2.0 Guy says save the date

Jake Kuramoto tweets “working on another pdx lunch 2.0, july 23 save the date”

Cubist Job, CubeSpace

This could be the job for you. “We are looking for someone to work part time at the front desk of CubeSpace. The position, however, is far from a typical reception position. As the first person our members see when they walk into our space, you will be the ambassador to our community. You will help create the first impression and set the tone for our members’ and subscribers’ experiences. You will be a critical link in building a thriving workspace community.”

Core Developer Job, Collaborative Software Initiative

Is this you? “Web application developer to join the UT-NEDSS Core Team. This is an opportunity for a self-starting individual to participate in a ground-breaking effort that combines non-technical subject matter experts with skilled professional developers in a major, well-funded, open source community and project.”

Spend summer indoors: Attend a tech conference

Mike Rogoway writes “Like the swifts coming back to Chapman Elementary, techies are returning to Portland this summer for the usual slate of technology confabs. Here’s my annual rundown of some big ones…”

Why Portland? Intrigo succumbs to serendipity

[Editor: For those folks outside the Silicon Forest who stumble upon this blog, I tend to get a bunch of questions about Portland: What makes Portland so special? Why do I keep hearing about Portland? Should I move there? Can I stay at your house?

It goes on and on.

But they’re all really asking the same thing: Why Portland?

So, I’m starting a new series of posts entitled—appropriately enough—“Why Portland?” In so doing, I hope to provide some different viewpoints what makes Portland, the Silicon Forest, and the whole startup scene around here so special.]

Intrigo succumbs to serendipity

IntrigoGo to practically any Legion of Tech event or a Beer and Blog or a Portland Lunch 2.0, and more likely than not, you’ll have the pleasure of meeting someone from Intrigo, a small Portland-based development shop focused on helping startups get their products and sites to market as quickly as possible.

And Intrigo isn’t just participating. They’re sponsoring. They’re pitching in to help. They’re part and parcel of the burgeoning Portland startup scene.

They must have been around here forever.

Not exactly.

In reality, the first footsteps that Tucson, Arizona, founded Intrigo set in Portland were last October.

“Four days of rain,” said Nathan Bell, who helps run Intrigo.

They were here as part of a search for a new home for Intrigo. But at that point, Portland wasn’t really even on the list.

“We were looking to get out of Tucson,” said Bell. “We had a list of places we were exploring: San Francisco, Seattle, New York, Boston, Boulder, and Austin. But a couple of us were interested in looking at Portland.”

And yet, lo and behold, here they are in good old Portland. What won them over?

“Portland is so dense compared to the other cities. So focused in a small area with a very tight community,” said Bell. “Even with the weather, that visit had us putting Portland near the top of the list. And after a few conversations with the team, that was that.”

So, Intrigo packed up its entire company and began to relocate to Portland. Because, in their opinion, Portland had things that Tucson lacked, among them a good technology sector and growing startup scene. Things that were important for their business to succeed.

But the interesting thing was that that decision preceded their first face-to-face interactions with the Portland tech community. Even more interesting? At the point in time they were making that decision, the now exceptionally collaborative Portland Web startup community had just barely begun to gel.

But it was starting to gel. And there was one particular event that marked the beginning of that startup community getting more collegial: Ignite Portland.

And as serendipity would have it, that event was Intrigo’s introduction to the Portland startup scene.

“One of our first hires sent us a YouTube video from Ignite Portland,” said Bell. “And that led us to getting involved with the Legion of Tech. Because we wanted to support that kind of thing.”

And they’ve been continuing to support it ever since.

So, now Intrigo is indeed part of the startup scene that coincidentally seemed to come together even as they made their plans to move to the Rose City. They’re an anchor for events. And a definitive presence in the community.

They’ve helped make the Portland Web startup community what it is today. In effect, defining their own future. And they will—no doubt—continue to do so.

So, now, what does Intrigo see for Portland’s future? And what are they looking for from Portland?

“I’d like to see the Portland Web startup scene gain more and more critical mass,” said Bell. “I’d like to see this become a self-sustaining movement that attracts more and more companies to Portland.”

And as that happens, what is Intrigo’s role?

“We’re still maturing and working to find our niche,” said Bell. “We’re still figuring out how we’ll fit into the ecosystem around here. One thing is for sure, we’ll keep focusing on what we do well: building deeply technical Web apps for startups.”

If this is the way Intrigo spends its first six months in town, I can’t wait to see what they’re capable of doing once they’re settled.

For more on Intrigo, follow the Intrigo blog. To keep tabs on Nathan Bell, follow nathanpbell on Twitter.

Silicon Florist’s links arrangement for May 26

Portland Lunch 2.0 at Vidoop (Wednesday, May 28, 2008)

Come one, come all, whether geek or not. Have some lunch on Vidoop, mix and mingle with your fellow Portlanders, learn about the tech scene in Portland, go home or back to work happy and full.

New blog, by and about WikiProject Oregon

Pete Forsyth writes “I’m very excited to announce that WikiProject Oregon, a loose collection of Wikipedia volunteers who share an interest in Oregon, has just started its own blog: wikiprojectoregon.wordpress.com.”

MetroFi Is Dot.Gone

The Portland citywide free wifi demise is complete, according to Om Malik, who writes “In what is proving to be yet another high-profile Metro Wi-Fi failure, MetroFi, a San Jose-based startup that raised over $15 million from Sevin Rosen and August Capital, is close to shutting down, according to WiFi NetNews and MuniWireless, two blogs that follow the MuniFi industry closely.” Long live Personal Telco!

Scoble is right: Portland deserves more geek cred

Wow. Two Scoble mentions in one week. Who’d of thunk? (For those curious types, the other Scoble mention.)

Aaron Hockley shook me from my travel stupor, highlighting Scoble’s recent post “Israel: A country too far from Mike Arrington’s house” and advising me that the post was “perfect fodder for a Silicon Florist post. ”

He’s right. It is.

Scoble’s post is mostly about Israel. And, honestly, I have to agree with him. I had the opportunity to work with a Portland startup whose development team was in Israel. And I also got to work with some Israeli developers at another not-so-startup gig in Portland.

Scoble nails it. It’s an amazing tech scene over there.

But that’s not why I’m posting.

I’m posting because he also says this:

I’ve started noticing a trend: that the further away a tech area is from Silicon Valley the less respect that area will get…. Do you agree or disagree that people, companies, countries can get the respect and/or tech industry PR they deserve if they are far away from Silicon Valley?

And I can’t even begin to tell you how happy this makes me. How thrilled I am to hear this kind of thinking. You mean, there might actually be something interesting happening in technology outside of Silicon Valley? Do you think?

But, as to his question, that’s a bit more difficult. Because I honestly don’t know. It’s really, really hard to get folks in the Valley to pay attention to folks outside of the Valley.

There is a ton of noise down there. And what’s more, there’s always the potential for face-to-face meetings. There’s real, honest-to-goodness networking. Like the stuff we do around here with Portland Lunch 2.0, Ignite Portland, and BarCamp Portland.

But the access points are entirely different.

Down there, you have access to a bunch of people like Arrington, Scoble, Om Malik, Jerimiah Owyang, Jason Calacanis, Scott Beale… the list goes on and on. Up here? You can only bug Marshall Kirkpatrick for coverage about five to six times a week before he starts getting upset. (Trust me, I’ve tested this limit, time and time again.)

Now, Scoble’s been to Portland before, so I know he’s aware of some of the stuff happening up here. But he’s not here enough. We’re not connected enough.

Down there, there’s more potential:

I’ve noticed this when I visited MySpace: they were so excited when I visited because they say that tech bloggers never visit. I was thinking back to my own experiences. Yes, that’s true. Facebook employees regularly meet up with us at parties and dinners and conferences. We run into MySpace employees far less often. These personal connections turn into stories on blogs.

And yes, while it’s nice and quaint that I try to make sure your projects are getting coverage here on the little ol’ Silicon Florist blog, that’s only going to get us part of the way. And a small part of the way, at that.

Ideally, I’d really like to see Portland getting the credit it deserves—on a regular basis—in more well-read publications, like TechCrunch, Scobelizer, GigaOm, and ReadWriteWeb. And The New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, and the San Jose Merc.

We’re on the right path. And the tide is starting to turn. But there’s still a long ways to go.

I’d be interested in your thoughts on how we can continue to grease the skids. What more can I be doing to help you? What more can we be doing as a community to get the startups here in Portland more of the attention they deserve?

I’d love to hear your thoughts.

Silicon Florist’s links arrangement for April 12, 2008

Sometimes, a link says more than I could ever say. Here are some fragrant little buds I’ve found recently, courtesy of ma.gnolia.

Portland has been added to Google Transit Maps

And the map geeking continues. DailyWireless notes that the Portland transit system has been added to Google Transit Maps. “If your results include a button for ‘Take Public Transit,’ Google Transit will spell out directions to the closest station or bus stop, including schedule information.”

CNN likes the new Jive site

Michael Sigler of Jive Software tweets a kudo to the team based on feedback from CNN.

The Insider Secrets of Angel Investing

Allen Stern writes, that of Angel funded deals, “Out of 10 deals: 5 will go out of business, 2 will return what the Angel put in, 2 will return 3x, and 1 must return 30x.” Some great insight for those of you seeking funding.

EllisLab Hiring, Two Positions Available

EllisLab just moved this blog post back up to the top of its postings, so I’m assuming that the “Code Mechanic” and “Senior Technical Support Specialist” are still open.

Mayor salutes Ward & wikis

At this year’s InnoTech conference (next Wednesday and Thursday at the Oregon Convention Center), Portland Mayor Tom Potter will present the third annual Mayor’s Technology Award to Ward Cunningham.

Seven Tips for Making the Most of Your RSS Reader

Marshall Kirkpatrick writes “I was feeling frustrated yesterday when switching from one feed reader to another on a new computer. Then I remembered how wonderful RSS really is – and I decided to write this post. I hope you’ll find it interesting and useful.”

Portland Lunch 2.0 at eROI

Bram Pitoyo writes “Lunch 2.0 was, in my opinion, one of the best places to talk with people who may not necessarily work in your industry, but who share the same passion about technology, and thus can provide catalysts for generation of new ideas and solutions. You’ll meet old friends or new colleagues, catch up and learn a few things about them, and then, through the conversation that happens, inspire you to better yourself or explore new ideas.”

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Silicon Florist’s links arrangement

Sometimes, a link says more than I could ever say. Here are some fragrant little buds I’ve found recently, courtesy of ma.gnolia.

Lunch 2.0 » Portland Lunch 2.0 Launches

Yesterday, about 50 geeks and non-geeks gathered at AboutUs.org in their sweet, newly-remodeled space in the Olympic Mills Commerce Center for the inaugural Portland Lunch 2.0. The event felt very Portland with no formal agenda and no presentations, just a good lunch with good people.

PDX Tech Calendar: RSVP for March 1 Code Sprint

Another code sprint for the calagator.org project has been scheduled for Saturday, March 1. If you’re interested in joining in on the fun, make sure to RSVP here.

Beer and Blog – Update your blog software at Lucky Labrador Brew Pub (Friday, February 29, 2008) – Upcoming

It’s already time for another Beer and Blog. This week’s topic? Update your blog software – how to put your CMS on a SVN or similar automagic updating system.

March 1st is Calagator Code Sprint Time

Possible tasks for this week include: finally getting that iCalendar import working, sending polite emails to organizations that don’t currently provide a calendar feed, and drafting ideas for the full event listing UI. Programmers, designers, and other tech community members are all welcome.

GoLife Mobile framework and the imminent Apple iPhone SDK

The GoLife team are fans of Apple’s device and we’re excited by the opportunity to develop for it. The SDK poses a distinct opportunities for GoLife Mobile and developers who support our framework. Application portability benefits everyone from the developer down. Developers can devote time and resources to one medium and won’t have to worry about supporting multiple platforms. That’s the beauty of a mobile framework and thats the beauty of GoLife Mobile.

SplashCast creates “Open Gym” application for Converse (Nike)

SplashCast has announced the launch of the Converse splashcast application this week to promote the mega-sport brands’ cross-media campaign called “Open Gym”. The campaign is all about bringing great basketball facilities and equipment to urban centers across the country. Old gyms will be renovated and the kids will get free shoes and equipment for the courts. The initial Open Gym cities include Miami, Chicago, and Philadelphia.In other news, being a grammar geek, I’ve noticed some new SplashCast additions to the English language. SplashCast (proper noun) is the company while splashcast (noun) refers to the player in which the media resides, which of course makes splashcasting (verb) the act of playing media through the splashcast from SplashCast.

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