Results for: shizzow

Greenlight Greater Portland: Sending another Portland startup contingent

I think it’s important for startup types to hear the report, but I think it’s even more important for Greenlight Greater Portland to know that we’re listening and paying attention.

For someone who covers startups, it’s incredibly interesting to keep tabs on an economic development body—especially one that’s a startup itself—like Greenlight Greater Portland.

Last year, I gathered a table of Portland startups and influencers to listen to the Greenlight Greater Portland’s first “Greater Prosperity Index” report. This year, I decided to do exactly the same thing for Greenlight’s second report. Read More

Are you listed in the Silicon Florist wiki?

We all realize that there’s a ton of stuff happening in town. New startups, exciting side projects, crazy cool events. And every day it seems like we’re learning about more and more opportunities to draw the community together—or cool new technologies to test drive.

This leads to two issues. First, how do we keep track of all this stuff? And second, how do we filter all of this stuff?

Silicon Florist wiki to the rescue, my friends! Well or you can refer to it by its more common name: AboutUs. Read More

Want Twitter search analytics done right? Portland’s Clicky may have nailed it

If there’s one thing we here in Portland love, it’s our Twitter. And it’s not just because the inimitable Rael Dornfest, Twitter’s user experience (UX) engineer, happens to live in Portland.

No, it’s something deeper than that. Twitter works for Portland’s dynamic. It meshes with our culture and our geekiness and our whatever.

And so it should come as absolutely no surprise that, when it comes to understanding Twitter, Silicon Forest startups come up with some interesting solutions. Like Portland-based Twitalyzer. And like the latest feature from Clicky, the lightweight yet extremely feature-heavy Web analytics tool. The new feature with which I’m so impressed? It’s called Twitter brand monitor. (Calm down, Dawn.) Read More

SoMe Awards winners: Who walked away with the social media crowns?

Remember Encyclopedia Brown? He was this kid detective who could always figure out random stuff using random clues? He was kind of like the MacGyver of the youth sleuth scene.

Well we had a little bit of a mystery going on ourselves tonight in the world of the Portland, Oregon, social media scene that needed some solving:

Who had taken home the honors from the Social Media Awards—the coveted SoMe Awards?
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SoMe Awards announces social media finalists for its inaugural ceremony

Social Media AwardsThe SoMe Awards, a new award designed to recognize compelling uses of social media and outstanding campaigns, has announced the finalists for the inaugural SoMe Awards ceremony on April 23.

And the finalists are:

[UPDATE] Whoa whoa whoa. Not so fast. Hold your horses, there’s been a little recount due to some dangling chads. The list of nominees below has been retooled a tad.

Social Media Award changes

Bloviater

Costa Pacific Homes
Edelman

House Party

Conkling, Fiskum & McCormick
Shizzow
Portland Trailblazers

Next big thing

TwitalyzerWeb Analytics Demystified
Grady Britton
Logobama
Waggener Edstrom Worldwide – Twendz

Scrappy

Anvil Media John McPhee
LiP Service and Big DealPR
@Notatsxsw

Sugar Daddy

StepChange Group
The New Group
Marcelino Alvarez

Wildcard

GoSeeTell Network
IntelBryan Rhoads
Supporting CharactersCarri Bugbee

On Thursday, April 23, one winner from each group will be selected—based on their “originality, effectiveness and creativity”—as the inaugural recipients of the award.

Cost of attendance is $15 and space is limited. No word on whether the event will be streamed.

For more on the event, visit the SoMe Awards.

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Like to use the same username everywhere? FriendsCall.Me can help

Friends Call MeSpend any time on a social network where you’re identified by a username or handle—be that Twitter, Digg, StumbleUpon, Flickr, Shizzow, Gmail, or a multitude of other sites—and you’ll rapidly become associated with that name.

Need an example of this in action? Just show up to a Portland tech event. I can all but guarantee “What’s your Twitter name?” comes up at some point in the conversation.

But like anything online, once you’ve found a name you like, it becomes a matter of consistently using—and reserving it—on sites that you may use. Just so everyone knows that it’s you.

We all get very defensive about our username. And we’ve been dealing with this issue since the days of BBS—actually maybe even CBs, good buddy.

And then there’s the confusion when you have folks who use the same name or who switch identities from service to service. Are you the @aaron from Twitter or the @aaron from identi.ca?

Worst of all? What happens when someone else snags your identity and uses it against you? Like the situation with which the folks from OurPDX were dealing with on Twitter.

To date, the best defense has been the “new social network land grab.” It’s a lemming-like rush to the cliff of every new social network site that crops up. We all sprint over, register our preferred username, and squat on it—just in case we decide to use that social network at some point in the future.

Oh my. Who knew social networking would end up being so much work? I just want my friends to know me, wherever I happen to be. Why does that have to be such a pain in the ass?

Well, thanks to Portland-based FriendsCall.Me, it just got a lot easier. Built by DariusMonsef and PureForm—the duo behind COLOURlovers—FriendsCall.Me cures a whole bunch of the headaches surrounding social network identity management—and it gives you a beautiful new profile/lifestream to boot.

Friends Call Me Turoczy even though they can’t pronounce it

Or, in the words of FriendsCall.Me:

We’re living in the age of the social web. Just about every website you join has a profile for you to fill out. A huge number of really great sites will come online in the next few years and every one will have another profile… this disconnected mess of profiles is going to become more and more of a pain to manage. We’re paving the first steps on the way to helping you organize all those profiles. In the comings days and weeks we’ll be bringing online features that not only allow you to check a username, but register a profile and sync it with all your other profiles… and along the way show you some interesting sites you might not have known about.

So the problems I mentioned above? Owning your chosen username, letting people know you’re you even though your usernames may be different, and getting alerts when new social networks come online? Done, done, and done with FriendsCall.Me.

Want to see where your username is being used? Just run a username check and you’ll see all the spots where it’s living.

If you’re looking to consolidate your profiles under one roof, sign up for an account. Then, you can add a bunch of your social media and social networking accounts to your profile page. Your new FriendsCall.Me profile aggregates all of your identities in one spot.

Finally, if you’re looking to keep control of that identity, you’ve got a bevy of options on how you get alerts. Want every site that comes online? Fine. Just want photo sites? Fine. Mix and match the alerts to meet your needs.

What’s that? Your favorite site isn’t there? That’s easily remedied.

Seen this before?

I’m sure you have. FriendsCall.Me is sure, too:

You may notice that FriendsCall.Me works a lot like some other sites you may have seen… that’s because some of the features we provide aren’t exactly new. The username checking susernameervice was well executed by Jon Sykes before he turned his site off… and several clones have popped up since. In that way, our features are a little “Me Too” but we’re not much for simply copying an old idea and rebranding it. We saw an opportunity to take a few concepts and stir them all together to create a new and much more useful service.

But I like the way these guys think, they’ve got a ton of experience in dealing with social networks, and—let’s face it—I’m going to give any Silicon Forest startup the benefit of the doubt.

I’d love to hear what you think. Give FriendsCall.Me a try and let me know.

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Ada Lovelace Day: Celebrating Portland women in technology

Ada LovelaceToday is Ada Lovelace Day, a day to celebrate women who are excelling in the world of technology.

Who was Ada Lovelace, you ask?

Augusta Ada King, Countess of Lovelace was born on 10th December 1815, the only child of Lord Byron and his wife, Annabella. Born Augusta Ada Byron, but now known simply as Ada Lovelace, she wrote the world’s first computer programmes for the Analytical Engine, a general-purpose machine that Charles Babbage had invented.

That got me to thinking. I’m incredibly lucky to get the chance to work with a number of extremely talented and technically adept women. And I get the chance to work with many of them on a weekly basis, which is awesome. Many of you are just as lucky as me.

So I thought I’d list some of the cool female geeks in Portland whom I am proud to know:

Selena Deckelmann

She’s the co-founder of Open Source Bridge, has had code committed to PostgreSQL, attends and speaks at any number of conferences, served as one of the original board members for Legion of Tech, and provides some exemplary guidance on killing chickens.

Audrey Eschright

She’s the other co-founder of Open Source Bridge, a founding member of Legion of Tech, a celebrated Rubyist, the driving force behind Calagator, and one of the most creative thinkers in the Northwest.

Dawn Foster

She’s a wizard with Yahoo! Pipes, a sage with community development, a hardworking startup type with Shizzow, one of the founders of Legion of Tech, and from what I understand, one mean werewolf player.

All of these women have been an absolute inspiration for me. And I’m truly honored that I get the chance to work with them on a regular basis.

And just as I’m in the midst of writing this post, I see a tweet come across from Steven Walling, validating my choices—and adding Amber Case, who is amazing in her own right.

Steven Walling Ada Lovelace Day recommendations

But for as much as I love the local scene, I’d be remiss if I didn’t mention two other incredibly inspiring women in the tech scene who have gained—and will continue to have—my utmost admiration.

Kathy Sierra

She’s an incredible speaker and thought-provoking writer whose Creating Passionate Users completely changed the way I thought about marketing and writing—and was a direct inspiration for Silicon Florist.

Beth Kanter

She’s taught me how to think about the power and the promise technology holds for doing good. And her Gnomedex performance, last year, remains one of the coolest technological experiments I’ve ever seen—even though it had very little to do with technology and everything to do with people.

Which women are excelling in technology in your world?

If there are women in technology who inspire you, I’d love to hear about—and I’m sure they would, too. Who are the other women in Portland technology or Silicon Forest technology who deserve some recognition? Why not take a few minutes to write something up? There’s still time.

(Image courtesy Anyaka. Used under Creative Commons)

Geek Bat signal: Oregon entrepreneurs need to act now! No, really. I mean right now.

Last night, an endless volley of entrepreneurs and would-be startups stepped up to a mic at Nedspace and provided a 2-3 minute pitch on what they would do with $250,000 over the next year.

And man, were there some incredible ideas—some incredibly cool, some incredibly wacky—but all incredible nonetheless.

There was only one problem: I didn’t see you up there.

I can watch the video again, just to be sure. But I’m fairly certain you won’t appear.

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I mean, sure. I got to see Ron Barrett, Carolynn Duncan, Dave Howell, Scott Kveton, Sasha Mace, John Metta, Chris Logan, Bob Uva, Ken Westin, and Steve Woodward. I love all of those folks. And I’ll applaud anyone who gets up in front of a crowd to speak, because I certainly don’t relish it.

Heck, somebody from the Office of the State Treasurer for Oregon even showed up.

But I didn’t see you. And that made me kind of sad.

But, then again, I’m all about second chances. So how about this? How about you take a few seconds to provide some details about one, two, or 12 of your current side projects? Take a moment to reflect on what you could do with $250,000 in the next year, to help bring your product or idea to fruition.

Don’t think you’re worthy? Not interested in getting funding? I’d still encourage you to take a few moments to respond. Really, what could it hurt?

The point is this: rising water floats all boats. And our state treasurer needs convincing that we have a viable entrepreneurial environment filled with viable startups just waiting to take form. What’s more, if these folks can pull off putting together a $100 million fund for Oregon startups, it’s going to help all of us.

But don’t just take my word for it. David Abramowski has some great insights about what funding Oregon startups could do for the local economy.

Come to think of it, I don’t even care if you live in Oregon right now. If you’d be willing to relocate to Oregon to start your business, you’re more than welcome to fill out the form, as well.

So maybe you’re trying to build a music service or a calendar aggregator or a niche social network or a new form of CRM or an iPhone agency or a mobile development shop focused on usability or a better support tool or charting where you’ve been or figuring out where your friends are or providing space for your peers to work and socialize or archiving the Web or finding happy hours or producing a weekly podcast or providing information about every Web site ever.

Maybe what you’re really interested in doing isn’t even geeky. Maybe you’re more interested in building out a photography business or covering the Portland scene or building some tangible product or creating a new kind of agency.

I don’t really care. We just need smart people like you to share their ideas about what could be done, if the money was there.

And I know you’ve got some ideas.

But here’s the catch: you need to respond, now. And I mean right now. The team pursuing the fund wants to get this information assembled by Wednesday, March 25.

So take a deep breath and dive in. I’ll keep this form open until Wednesday at midnight. Then, I’ll gather up all of the responses and ship them off to the folks working on this. They, in turn, will crate them up and dump them on the Oregon Treasurer’s, the Governor’s, and the various Mayors’ desks.

Remember, there were some cool ideas pitched, last night. But none of them were as cool as yours.

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Silicon Florist’s links arrangement for March 10

SLL: Shizzow is Everywhere | OurPDX

Cami Kaos writes “Friday night we were joined by Ryan Snyder and Dawn Foster of our friendly local Shizzow! We had a great time with them on the couch talking about Shizzow going global. Listen to (or watch) the Tech Edition to find out more about Shizzow and get info about SXSWi!”

(tags: portland oregon sll strangelovelive camikaos shizzow ryansnyder dawnfoster geekygirldawn drnormal)

CLIF BAR Save Our Snow iPhone App

Another cool iPhone app from Raven Zachary and team “Fight global warming on your iPhone by making an informed choice about where to ski or snowboard. Too warm for snow? Freeze over your iPhone screen with a single breath.”

(tags: iphone ravenme ravenzachary semaphoria apple apps applications clif snow sos)

Five Simple Ways to Improve an AboutUs Page

Via AboutUs “In all types of wikis, we often see folks who have something of value to contribute but just need a few ideas to jump-start their efforts. If you’re feeling that way in regards to our community, here are five things you can do to create a more comprehensive, effective, and attractive page on AboutUs.”

(tags: aboutus wiki portland oregon insight howto tips)

1,000 posts later… a reminder of CAOS Theory’s raison d’être

Via The 451 Group “This is the one thousandth post to have been published on the 451 CAOS Theory blog, three years and six days since Raven wrote the first post, describing the blog’s raison d’être. It’s interesting to look back at Raven’s first post as a reminder as to why the CAOS Theory blog was launched and how it continues to add value to what we do and – we hope – the open source ecosystem at large.”

(tags: insight 451group caostheory opensource 451 blogs bloggers)

Data Flows and Crises in Online Reputation Economies

Amber Case writes “In a global, ever-connected economy, it is finally possible to rely on citizen media outlets to receive news almost as soon as it happens, however, people often have a limited basis on which to determine validity. Online, time and space for information gathering is compressed. This also means that time and space for decision making is also reduced. This is why online social networks try to use online metrics to establish validity in as short amount of time as possible.”

(tags: ambercase caseorganic portland oregon reputation insight data twitter)

My Strategy for Keeping Up with People & Info at SXSW

Dawn Foster writes “This afternoon, Katherine Gray (aka @thiskat) asked me about my strategy for keeping up with everything at sxsw, and I realized that I didn’t really have one. Here’s a start of one, but I would love to hear what tools other people are using.”

(tags: portland oregon dawnfoster geekygirldawn sxsw insight)

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