Results for: open source bridge

Open Source Bridge: Calling all open source citizens

[Full disclosure: I am on the volunteer committee helping to organize Open Source Bridge.]

Open Source BridgeAs many of you know, OSCON will be held in San Jose, this year. And RailsConf will be in Las Vegas. That left Portland—arguably the de facto hub of all things open source-y—strangely devoid of a major open source conference until Linux Plumbers Conference in September.

And that just didn’t seem right. So Audrey Eschright and Selena Deckelmann decided to do something about it. And they got a bunch of other volunteers together who wanted to help. That became Open Source Bridge.

You see, if there’s one thing I love about Portland, it’s our entrepreneurial spirit. We weren’t just going to sit around and cry in our microbrewed beers about it. We Portlanders are going to figure out how to do something else. We’ll show them.

And true to form, here’s Open Source Bridge, a new grassroots-organized open-source-developer-oriented conference that’s slated to be held in Portland, next summer.

Fast forward to today and that dream has officially become a reality. Registration is now open for Open Source Bridge.

Costs? You can attend the three-day conference—June 17-19—for $175. But you have to act quickly. That early bird rate expires on April 1. And if you’re coming from out of town—heck if you’re coming from Beaverton—you can get a room at the Hilton for $139/night.

Why would you stay at the Hilton? Four words my friend. Well, actually one number and three words: 24-hour hacker lounge.

Personally, it’s been an incredible experience, thus far, working with the amazing people volunteering to pull this off. Open Source Bridge is a different kind of conference. And it’s yet another incredible event that’s going to put Portland on the map.

Different how? It’s about open source culture for developers. It’s about being open source citizens:

We’re planning a conference that will connect developers across projects, across languages, across backgrounds to learn from each other. We want people to experience something beyond “how to use tool X” or “why databases keel over when you do Y” (even though those topics are important, making up our tools and trade, and will be a central part of the conference content). We’d like to share what open source means to us, what it offers, where we struggle, and why we do this day in and day out, even when we’re not paid for it.

Hopefully, you’ll put up with me continuing to blather on about it. Because I think it’s yet another example of the Portland community doing things in a very Portland-y way and—as usual—wildly succeeding.

I’m hoping to see you there.

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Beer and Blog & Open Source Bridge: Two great tastes that taste great together

Beer and BlogLast night at the Portland Web Innovators presentation, I got the chance to laud compliments on Beer and Blog, an event that has really helped solidify the Web and Open Source startup community in Portland—and now Corvallis. A little later, I got the chance to share some of the early thinking on what will be the biggest volunteer event for Portland in 2009, Open Source Bridge.

Well, as luck would have it, whether you’re interested in Beer and Blog or Open Source Bridge, you can kill two birds with one stone this week. Because Beer and Blog this week will feature none other than Open Source Bridge:

Hi friends! Rick Turoczy asked me if he and the Open Source Bridge crew could lead some discussion tomorrow @beerandblog. I think what they are up to is valuable to the Portland community and her tech scene, so I said yes. If you’re not yet familiar with Open Source Bridge, they are a group of local techies that want to continue OSCON now that they are not coming back to Portland. But, they’re growing into much more than that.

So why not take some time out of your busy schedule of attending holiday parties to hang out with the Open Source Bridge team at Beer and Blog? Not interested in Open Source Bridge? Come on over anyway. You might find yourself having such a good time that you wind up wending your way over to the CyborgCamp pre-party at Vidoop.

RSVPs abound: Beer and Blog and the CyborgCamp pre-party.

I’m looking forward to seeing you there.

Open Source Bridge: Get involved in bridging the gap

We—and I’m using the royal “we”—were all a bit taken aback when O’Reilly decided to pull the plug on OSCON in Portland.

Was it something we said? Did we no longer have the “open source” cred? What did we do? Why hast thou forsaken us?

Confusion reined.

But it was only a momentary lapse.

You see, if there’s one thing I love about Portland, it’s our entrepreneurial spirit. We weren’t just going to sit around and cry in our microbrewed beers about it. We Portlanders are going to figure out how to do something else. We’ll show them.

And true to form, here’s Open Source Bridge, a new grassroots-organized open-source-developer-oriented conference that’s slated to be held in Portland, next summer.

What are we planning? I’m glad you asked. Let me let some of the Open Source Bridge organizers tell the story:

Selena Deckelmann writes:

I love conferences. And I love Portland. Maybe you can guess what’s coming next.

During an intense brainstorming session at Side Project To Startup, a group of concerned Portlanders drew together a plan for a new conference. We packed a tiny room, and had a heated discussion about what we wanted, what Portland needed, and how we might do it. By the end of the session, Audrey Eschright and I agreed to co-chair. And with the support of Portland’s incredible tech community, we knew we could make it happen.

Audrey Eschright writes:

I am excited to be co-chairing this event. Portland is a fabulous place to be working on open source projects, and we’re the ideal community to build an inclusive, diverse conference that focuses on developers’ interests and needs.

Dawn Foster offers:

Were you sad and dismayed to hear that OSCON was moving out of Portland? Are you looking for more open source events to attend? Would you like an open source conference organized by the community? Want one more tech event to attend in July? Need an excuse (any excuse) to visit lovely Portland, Oregon in July? Do you like to help organize events for fun in your spare time?

If you answered yes to any of my obnoxious questions above, I have a great solution for you: The Open Source Bridge event.

Oh, yes. It’s on, my friend.

I’ve been lucky enough to be involved in some of the early planning. And there’s a great team working to make things happen.

Who?

Well Reid Beels, Professor Bart Massy, Jake Kuramoto, Kelly Guimont, Adam Duvander, and of course the folks quoted above. And the team is growing, adding Ward Cunningham, Irene Schwarting, Harvey Mathews, and Clay Neal (from the City of Portland) since our initial meetings.

Now, we need some help from you.

That’s right. You. We need you.

If this sounds like an interesting concept and you’re interested in contributing some of your time, join us at CubeSpace tonight (October 30) at 7:30 PM to take part in the Town Hall.

The Town Hall will give the organizers a chance to chat with you about the proposed event. And give you a chance to voice your opinions on what you’d like to see. It will also likely give us a chance to guilt you into helping convince you to join the cause and volunteer some time.

Can’t make it? No worries. Just make sure to let one of us know how you’d like to help.

Open Source Bridge is going to be an amazing event. I can tell, already. And I’m already looking forward to seeing you there. Even though I’m not even really sure where there is yet.

At the very least, I hope to see you at CubeSpace on Thursday, October 30.

Shazam! Voila! and Alakazam! OpenSesame wins OEN Angel Oregon 2011 and 4-Tell walks away with the crowd favorite

When it comes to critiques of the Portland startup scene, one of the chief complaints is a shortage of “successful exits” and “repeat entrepreneurs.” We see them here and there. With the Iterasis and the Urban Airships and the AboutUses. But for the most part, those types of Portland startups are few and far between.

But that may be changing. At OEN Angel Oregon yesterday, we not only saw a couple of tech companies walk away with some recognition, we saw some repeat entrepreneurial talent take on their next challenges. Read More

Is Portland, Oregon, really the de facto hub of open source? Montreal, Quebec, and Raleigh, North Carolina, say no

[HTML3]Okay. I may be a little overly fond of calling Portland the “de facto hub of open source.” I mean, we play host to OSCON and Open Source Bridge. We’ve got a very active open source community. Our fair city has opened up its data to let people hack to their hearts’ content. And we’re home to a bevvy of open source types like Steve Holden and, yes, Linus Torvalds. Heck, we even have open source based companies like Puppet Labs that are getting funded. And some of the most influential folks on Github Read More

Python and open source advocate Steve Holden wants to help Portland live up to its open source moniker

Steve Holden, a staunch proponent of open source and one of the leading folks in the community surrounding the Python open source programming language. And guess what? He lives in Portland now, too.

When it comes to describing the Portland tech scene—and I’ll admit I’m more guilty of this than most—it’s championed as the de facto hub of the open source community. I mean, OSCON and Open Source Bridge are held here. Our open source user group activity is off the charts. And, tired or not, we’ll always play the Linus Torvalds card.

But there’s still more to be done. And last night, someone challenged the entire town to do more. Who? Steve Holden, a staunch proponent of open source and one of the leading folks in the community surrounding the Python open source programming language. And guess what? He lives in Portland now, too.
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Sprechen Sie open source? Here are two upcoming events where you should be doing that speaking

there’s no better opportunity to share what you know than speaking at conferences so throw your hat in the ring for two big open source opportunities: Open Source Bridge and Linuxfest Northwest.

Sure, sure. Portland is the de facto hub of open source. That’s no secret. But some things are. Like all that open sourcey knowledge you have crammed into your brain. That’s not right to be keeping all of that awesome open sourceness to yourself, is it?

The correct answer is “No. No it isn’t.”

But how do we share that knowledge effectively? Well, there’s no better opportunity to share what you know than speaking at conferences. And right now, you can throw your hat in the ring for two big open source opportunities: Open Source Bridge and Linuxfest Northwest. Read More

On open source and government: An accidental manifesto

[HTML1]A number of us recently read the Willamette Week’s coverage of open source and the City of Portland’s engagement with the open source community. Seeing this type of coverage from a mainstream publication was a high watermark of sorts. A step forward. But how big of a step?

I asked Audrey Eschright, Open Source Bridge co-founder, the driving force behind Calagator, and local open source advocate, for her take on it—for more details on her position, more insight into her thinking. What she provided wound up being—by her own admission—an accidental manifesto on open source and municipal government. Read More

Psst! Hey buddy! Want to hack on a little open municipal data from Portland?

So, as you may have heard, the City of Portland has opened up their data to outside developers. And they’ve been running the CivicApps contest to encourage participation. As part of that effort, they had planned to hold a hackathon—CiviCode Day—this weekend. But those plans changed.

Now you know as well as I do that you don’t want to get a bunch of developers all riled up to code and then pull the rug out from under them. I mean, you’re courting mutiny or anarchy or some other -y kind of word. And that’s why they’re going to be hacking anyway. Unofficially of course. Read More

Portland, open data, and CivicApps: 101 open datasets for your geeking pleasure

Enter CivicApps. A contest sponsored by the City of Portland designed to help stimulate and motivate the development community to mix and match all the awesome datasets

Remember back when the City of Portland opened up its data to developers? Sure you do. But you know what? All the accessible data in the world isn’t of much use unless someone is doing something with it. And that’s why the City is interested in getting people to come up with ideas for using the data—to improve the city and our way of life.

Enter CivicApps. A contest sponsored by the City of Portland designed to help stimulate and motivate the development community to mix and match all the awesome datasets—more than 100 different types—available from the City. Read More