Results for: funding

Portland Start-up Index: Is your site there?

Given that I’m still happily digging out from an avalanche of new Twitter followers, I’m a little tardy on reporting the news.

So, a number of folks were kind enough to send me links to TechvibesPortland Start-up Index,” a list of Portland-based startups ranked by averaging their Alexa and Compete ratings.

According to the post, they chose the Rose City because:

Portland’s unique culture, combined with its proximity to Seattle and Silicon Valley make it fertile ground for start-ups.

The list features an apples and oranges combination of both companies and products (which, quite honestly, isn’t immediately obvious to people who don’t obsess over monitor this stuff as actively as I do). So, companies with multiple products—but only one Web site—like Earth Class Mail (#5) (which unfortunately moved to Seattle to attract funding) and Kryptiq (#20) are mixed in with site-specific products like Matt King‘s Knitmap (#8) and JanRain‘s Pibb (#10).

SplashCast tops the list, with I Want Sandy and MyOpenID rounding out the top three.

Values of n garnered two spots on the index with I Want Sandy and Stikkit (#6). As did JanRain, with MyOpenID and Pibb.

Some notable sites conspicuously absent from the list include Jive Software, Platial, Unthirsty, and AboutUs. But commenters are already noting some of these exclusions.

Techvibes plans to update the list on a regular basis. And, I’m looking forward to seeing a few more of you folks on it, the next time around. Please comment on the post (as a number of folks already have) to ensure that your product or site is listed.

(Hat tip to Mike Berkley, Adam DuVander, and Ben Parzybok)

OEN says every time a bell rings an Angel looks to fund a startup

It’s that time of year again. Yes, the time of year when I start trying to write headlines based on obscure references to classic holiday movies.

But, it’s also time for the Oregon Entrepreneurs Network (OEN) to open submissions for Angel Oregon, the annual competition that lands one lucky startup a chunk of Angel funding.

Angel Oregon 2008 is coming and it’s bigger than ever! Applications are being accepted now through Jan. 11, 2008. We invite companies to compete for $300K in investment prizes, awarded in three distinct investment tracks. A Grand Prize Winner will walk away with $150K, with two runners-up receiving $75K each [contingent on Angel Oregon hitting its recruitment goals].

Angel Oregon is a program of Oregon Entrepreneurs Network (OEN) and is the nation’s premier matchmaking event. Angel Oregon focuses on bringing together Oregon and SW Washington’s brightest entrepreneurial talent with qualified Angel investors. Last years Angel Oregon event was perhaps the most successful ever with the top company, M-Six, walking away with $230k. For more information or to apply, visit Angel Oregon.

South of the Forest: Meet Oregon Investment Fund in Medford

Granted, Medford, Oregon, is more “real forest” than “Silicon Forest.” But this event seemed to be right in line with the entrepreneurial spirit of the Silicon Florist, so I thought I’d pass it along. (Besides, I’m always hoping that a few of you Rose City startups can get a slice of that $100 million of love that is the Oregon Investment Fund (OIF).)

On November 14, CreditSuisse, managers of the OIF, will be hosting “Real-world Case Studies of Emerging Companies Searching for Funding.”

Sure, Medford’s a bit of a haul. But far be it from me to keep you from a road trip.

For more information on the event, see the press release. To register, visit the Southern Oregon Regional Economic Development site.

What’s the Oregon Investment Fund? I’m glad you asked. You see, in July 2003, the Oregon State Legislature approved a mandate for the Oregon Investment Council (OIC) to design and implement a US$100 million program that encourages the growth of small businesses within the state of Oregon. To accomplish this mandate, the OIC chose to develop a fund of funds, the Oregon Investment Fund. This fund, which is capitalized by funds from the OIC, has committed capital to private equity and venture capital funds that in turn invest in companies located primarily in the state of Oregon, as well as the Pacific Northwest region. Contact www.oregoninvestmentfund.com for more information.

iovation lands $10 million from Intel Capital

iovation, a Portland-based startup that focuses on combating online fraud—and which also allows you to begin sentences with a lower-case letter—has announced a new round of funding, led by a $10 million investment from Intel Capital. The total round sits at $15 million.

iovation, headquartered in Portland, Oregon pioneered the use of device reputation for managing online fraud, abusive behavior and multi-factor authentication. Today, iovation manages the reputation of millions of Internet-enabled devices worldwide, allowing its customers to control online fraud and abuse while benefiting from sharing device reputation intelligence. For more information on iovation and the company’s products, visit www.iovation.com.

(Hat tip Silicon Forest)

Jive’s new space should include a bigger trophy case

Portland-based Jive Software continues on its award-winning roll. First, they walked away with a cash prize of $15 million from Sequoia. Then, they took home the OEN Entrepreneur Award. Now, they’ve walked away with top honors at Venture NW for “Outstanding Achievement.”

“As winners of the Outstanding Achievement Awards, Jive Software and nLIGHT represent the high caliber of companies and entrepreneurs in this region. These are two globally competitive companies that have proven that they are attractive to investors anywhere,” said Wayne Embree, managing partner of Reference Capital Management, LLC and Chairman of Venture Northwest 2007. “They remind us what is possible with the support from programs such as Oregon Entrepreneurs Network and Venture Northwest.”

Who else won? If the quotes are any indication, it sounds like Portland may be a winner, as well. If only in getting a little more of the entrepreneurial and venture-capitalistic attention and affection it so rightly deserves.

“Moving our company to Portland was one of the best business decisions we ever made. We quickly discovered that Portland has an immensely supportive entrepreneurial community and it has provided our company with a great environment in which to grow,” said Jive Software CEO, Dave Hersh. “Being chosen to receive this award is a great honor.”

I remain hopeful that this sort of Portland praise will begin to cut down on some of the location-related difficulties Silicon Forest startups are encountering as they pursue funding.

Jive outgrows its current digs

With its recent infusion of funding and rash of hiring, Portland-based Jive Software is outgrowing its current space at 317 SW Alder.

No word on whether they’ve selected new digs or not.

But their old space—exposed brick and all—will soon be up-for-grabs.

Jive Software develops award-winning collaboration software that improves a company’s productivity through open collaboration among employees, partners and customers. For more information, visit Jive Software.

Stealth: Imindi thought engine

Currently in stealth mode but scheduled to launch in the coming weeks, Portland-based Imindi promises to bring the visual aspects of traditional mind-mapping software to a broader spectrum of activities. The aggressive product vision, outlined on the Imindi blog, has the product helping with everything from collaborative writing to collaborative search to social bookmarking.

At its foundation, the company describes the Imindi product as a “thought engine”:

The Imindi Thought Engine enables you to input your Thoughts and the semantic connections between them (Why, What, Where, When, Who, How) in a naturally radiant fashion with one thought radiating outward to one or many asoociated thought that themselves radiates outwards towards other thoughts which radiate outwards towards others and so on and so forth. The interface is essentially a visual map of your mind what we call a “Journey” here at Imindi.

The concept is interesting. But it is important to note that the visual aspect of the mind-map is not especially expansive—at least at this point. Currently, the Imindi product relegates the results to the first orbit, the items within direct connection of the central thought.

Personally, I’ve always found the value of graphic representations of the nature to be the orbits that are 3 to 4 steps away from the initial thought. This is where you start seeing the really interesting stuff happening.

With Imindi’s current product, you can definitely get to that point—one a click at a time–but as far as I can tell, you cannot currently see the entire universe or the path that led you to your current thought. [Update] The Imindi folks were nice enough to swing by and comment on the exact functionality I was seeking: expanded maps.

Obviously, is that it’s incredibly easy for me to sit here and pitch stones with no idea of how much work the algorithms and relationship logic actually took. So, while I criticize, I’d encourage you to take a look for yourself by visiting Imindi.

Imindi has received seed funding from Mind Fund of Portland.

Jive Talks (finally) talks about $15 million round

Last week, I saw the news on Jive Software securing a $15 million round of funding from venture firm Sequoia Capital.

Being the diligent type that I am, I immediately jumped over to the Jive site to get the full story.

Only there wasn’t anything there.

No press release. No blog post. Nothing. Crickets chirping.

But I’ve diligently checked the site, time and time again, since that point, and I am now happy to report that Jive is now talking about the round in a post from the CEO, Dave Hersh, on Jive Talks.

Hersh addresses questions that plague any startup making this sort of control-wresting decision:

  • Why did we raise the money?
  • Why did Sequoia choose Jive to win the space?
  • Why Sequoia?
  • What will change?
  • Was it a hard choice?

For more, read Dave Hersh’s post on Jive Talks, “More on our $15M Funding Round with Sequoia.”

[Update] Mike Rogoway of The Oregonian provides additional coverage—and a little link love for Silicon Florist (Thanks, Mike!)—on the Silicon Forest blog.

Jive Software secures $15 million… and moves blog to Clearspace

Big news coming out of Jive Software today. The company announced that it has secured a $15 million round of funding led by Sequoia Capital.

From VentureBeat

One with considerable momentum is Jive Software, a Portland, Ore. Its product, Clearspace, doesn’t tack various software programs together. It offers it all from ground-up: It lets employees and customers collaborate on a mix of blogs, wikis, forums, chat, tagging, files and reputation systems into a single interface behind the corporate firewall (or outside it, if customers are involved, in which case it governs a publishing system that controls what gets outside the firewall). The company was bootstrapped for years, but in February, hit a vein, says chief executive Dave Hersh — demand for its product became overwhelming.

Jive will do more than $15 million in sales this year, with the second quarter revenue almost double what it was the same quarter of last year. It has more than 2,000 customers, says Hersh, mentioning names like IBM, Sun and BEA. So it has taken $15 million from Silicon Valley venture firm Sequoia Capital, to handle the growth.

Mike Rogoway of The Oregonian also covered this round:

Jive said it plans to use the money to continue developing its software and to market its products. Jive is the latest company to benefit from a surge in venture capital backing Oregon businesses. Venture capitalists invested $173 million in Oregon companies during the first six months of the year, up from $76 million in the first half last year.

Mashable covered the funding, as well.

Still no post on the Jive blog or in the Jive newsroom, so I’ll provide other details as they become available.

[UPDATE] As of Monday morning, still nothing from the horse’s mouth, but Om Malik is reporting that the funding will be used to “push sales and marketing of its Clearspace line-up of products,” while Portland station KGW has pulled an AP story that states, “The company said it will be scaling up operations, development and setting up international offices as a result of the investment.”

In related news, when I headed over to the Jive blog to see if they had posted anything, I was happy to see that they had ported their blog to their own Clearspace product. “Eating their own dogfood” as it were.

Although, Clearspace appears to be mighty tasty dogfood.

VC Thunderdome: Seed Oregon

You’ve got good ideas. You’ve got elegant code. And you’ve got the next killer app. But what you could really use is some capital to make a real go of it.

That’s where funding comes into play. Oregon Entrepreneur Network understands.

So rather than make you come right out and beg, they have their own little Thunderdome for funding called Seed Oregon:

Nine presenting companies will be selected to compete in the Seed Oregon tournament. Each will have 10 minutes to present their concept to the PubTalk audience, followed by a 10 minute Q&A session. Three companies will compete at each of the the preliminary rounds, with the audience voting for the winning presentations to move to the championship round. The Angel Oregon Selection Committee will serve as judges for the championship round.

The competition is restricted to companies in the Portland metropolitan area who are currently seeking a seed round that is less than $2 million.

If you match those requirements and you’re interested in a little “two man enter one man leave,” consider sending in an application. The first round entry deadline is August 31, 2007.

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