Month: October 2008

JanRain OpenID could be the key to your health (vault)

myOpenIDIn June, that little software company to the north of us, Microsoft, made news by allowing OpenID logins to its Microsoft Health Vault product.

Problem was—as TechCrunch noted—only two OpenID relying parties were allowed to play:

Over 16 months after first declaring its support for the OpenID authentication platform, Microsoft has finally implemented it for the first time, allowing for OpenID logins on its Health Vault medical site. Unfortunately, Health Vault will only support authentication from two OpenID providers: Trustbearer and Verisign. Whatever happened to the Open in OpenID?

But now, Microsoft has decided to increase the number of relying parties by 50%. To three.

So who was the lucky relying party who made it through the door? Portland-based JanRain‘s myOpenID.

A number of folks—me among them—are surprised it’s taken Microsoft this long to add another relying party. And it seems like the list is still missing a few other obvious and highly secure choices.

But myOpenID is a great place to start:

JanRain’s myOpenID service, the first and most popular independent OpenID service on the Internet, provides consumers with a free, fully featured, reliable, and secure solution for managing their personal online identity. Every myOpenID user receives several choices for secure authentication beyond password. These enhanced security options include: Microsoft InfoCard, Client Certificate, or Phone-based two factor authentication.

For more information on the personal health record service, visit Microsoft Health Vault. For more on JanRain and its OpenID solutions, visit JanRain or myOpenID.

Silicon Florist’s links arrangement for October 01

OpenID Content Provider Advisory Committee Kickoff Meeting

Via the OpenID blog “A couple of weeks ago the BBC hosted twenty-six people from seventeen organizations including eight OpenID Providers and eight OpenID Relying Parties (sites which accept OpenID logins) in New York City to kick off an OpenID Content Provider Advisory Committee. The goal of the session was to answer specific questions by the Content Provider community (media companies and national affinity groups) as well as to provide feedback to the OpenID Foundation, its member companies, and the wider community on the future direction of OpenID.”

Flickr’s new iPhone web interface = AWESOME (with screenshots!) at Josh Bancroft’s TinyScreenfuls.com

Josh Bancroft writes “Saw word from John “Daring Fireball” Gruber tonight that Flickr finally launched an iPhone optimized web interface. Finally!”

Google Blogsearch Relaunches as Techmeme Killer, Across 11 Categories – ReadWriteWeb

Marshall Kirkpatrick writes “In its first major upgrade ever, Google Blogsearch just relaunched and looks radically different. Instead of the blank page look of Google.com, Blogsearch now looks like Google News (but uglier) – with the hottest topics from the blogosphere aggregated on the front page. Readers can drill down in 11 different categories, from technology, business, sports and entertainment. Google says you can use Blogsearch to see what the world is talking about.”

OSCON moves to San Jose – O’Reilly Radar

Via O’Reilly Radar “Clearly Portland was good for OSCON, but at the same time, we move most of our conferences every few years, to allow new local communities and organizations to participate and to provide new activities for non-local attendees. And while every conference planner likes to see yearly growth as a sign of a healthy conference, it’s a challenge to find space for 3000 people plus a projected growth of ~20% (based on previous years). The largest available keynote space at the Oregon Convention Center (the largest conference facility in Oregon) holds approximately 2500 people in our current layout (with a stage and airwall space to divide into smaller rooms for day sessions), and has an absolute maximum limit of 3600 people.”

Warehouse is now open source

Via the ENTP blog “After a long vacation, we’ve decided to release Warehouse as open source. The fact is, we (and most of our target audience) moved from subversion to git or mercurial. Also, the Logical Awesome guys scare us. First, there’s their kick ass git commit browser out there that embodies the spirit of git exceptionally well. Then, they prove that they can do Subversion hosting better than us. Yikes.”

Portland Start-up Index for October 2008: Must be autumn because everyone’s falling

Techvibes has added some new features to their startup indices in time for the release of the Portland Start-up Index for October 2008.

So who are the movers and shakers this month?

Iterasi is the big climber, moving up 12 slots to crack the top 20. Earth Class Mail and Free Range were the only others to make positive progress, moving up one slot a piece.

But boy-oh-boy are there some people dropping down the list. Grabb.it, Pibb, and Rocketbook all slid 13 spots each to lead the pack. And a ton of other folks fell close to 10 spots. It was veritable race to the bottom of the list.

So, here’s how the rankings stand this month:

  1. AboutUs
  2. MetaFilter
  3. Kongregate
  4. Discogs
  5. Digital Trends
  6. COLOURlovers
  7. Frappr!
  8. Jive Software
  9. SplashCast Media
  10. myOpenID
  11. Platial.com
  12. Earth Class Mail
  13. Pheedo
  14. Sandy
  15. Gone Raw
  16. Vidoop
  17. eROI
  18. Clicky
  19. Iterasi
  20. Zapproved
  21. Stikkit
  22. Active Reload
  23. Neighborhood Notes
  24. Walker Tracker
  25. Attensa
  26. GadgetTrak
  27. Avatron Software
  28. iovation
  29. UrbanDrinks.com
  30. NetWorthIQ
  31. FreeRange
  32. KnitMap
  33. ChoiceA
  34. Grabb.it
  35. Art Face Off
  36. LetsEat.at
  37. fmyi
  38. WeoGeo
  39. Pibb
  40. LUNARR
  41. MomHub
  42. GoLife Mobile
  43. Imindi
  44. GreenRenter
  45. Kryptiq
  46. Picktastic
  47. Jama Software
  48. Rocketbook
  49. Lightfleet
  50. Goboz
  51. Cendix
  52. Avnera
  53. Kumquat
  54. Techchex
  55. Vocal Nation
  56. Box Populi
  57. GoSeeTell
  58. YourList
  59. Collaborative Software Initiative
  60. IDP Solutions

As always, to see the details on who moved where and what the actual metrics are, visit the Techvibes Portland Start-up Index.

WordCamp Las Vegas recruits WordCamp Portland organizer, Aaron Hockley

WordCamp Las VegasNow, there’s another reason to consider making the trip down to WordCamp Las Vegas in January: WordCamp Portland organizer, Aaron Hockley, has announced that he’s officially on the agenda:

I’m going to explore how the local blog scene and other social media have brought folks together. Over the next couple of months, I’ll be talking to all sorts of Portlandy-types about their thoughts on our social media usage. Yes, that includes the Portland Twitter scene and of course #bacon. A big focus of my talk will be about how online activities have led to offline gatherings including group events like Ignite Portland, Side Project to Startup, and the Portland edition of Lunch 2.0. In addition to the formal events, services such as Shizzow and Twitter facilitate impromptu meetups.

Congratulations to Mr. Hockley on garnering a well-deserved speaking slot. It’s definitely got me thinking about making the trip down south to see him speak. Even though I won’t be able to post on it because of the whole “What happens in Vegas…” thing.

WordCamp:Las Vegas is a conference style event covering topics related to the WordPress software. It will be held January 10-11, 2009. For more information, visit WordCamp Las Vegas.

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