PSA: Your one to-do this weekend is installing a VPN on your devices

Now, unless you’ve been completely off the grid this week, you’ve no doubt heard rumblings of legislation that flew through congress that basically strips away any privacy about your browsing history. What’s more, it allows your ISP to sell that browsing history to the highest bidder to use however they see fit.

Now apart from the possible embarrassment of people learning how often you swing by Silicon Florist, there are some far more serious—and nefarious—things that can be done without these FCC protections. And if the Internet has taught us anything, it’s that we can always be prepared for people to do their worst.

So what to do? There’s no perfect solution. But many folks agree that installing a VPN on your devices is a good step.

That said, there is no clear favorite for providing that service.

Here’s where Portland comes in. I don’t care what you pick. Just pick something. But if you want to pick something that’s close to home, you might consider Cloak.

Cloak’s VPN encrypts all of your data before it leaves your devices. Importantly, your data stays encrypted while it transits through your ISP’s network. This means that, while your ISP might be able to see that you use a VPN, they won’t be able to see anything about what you’re actually doing online. Once your data reaches Cloak’s network, we decrypt it and send it onward, far outside the reach of your ISP.

What’s the Portland connection? Well, Cloak is a company founded in the Pacific Northwest that was acquired by StackPath. And while StackPath doesn’t have a huge presence in Portland—yet—one of their cofounders lives here. So it’s only sure to grow.

So you know me. I’m always one for buying local. Because when it comes down to trust, it’s always nice to be able to grab coffee with the people you’re trusting.

So if you complete one chore this weekend—whatever solution you choose—please secure your devices, mask your browsing history, and protect your privacy.

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