Category: Lunarr

LUNARR in retrograde: After several beta products, startup decides to close up shop

I always hate to report on this stuff, but sometimes you just have to. Portland-based LUNARR, one of the first companies to come out of stealth mode after I started Silicon Florist, has decided to close its doors.

Last Thursday, users of LUNARR’s Elements and Themes products received the following notice: Read More

Watching the Watcher watching Portland

Tom Foremski of Silicon Valley Watcher has a recent post that touches on an interview with Hideshi Hamaguchi and Toru Takasuka of Portland-based startup Lunarr. (You may also remember Hideshi for his presentation, “How to live like Japanese in Portland” at the first Ignite Portland.)

What struck me about “Portland’s High Tech Community And The Space To Think” was this little gem:

When I met with them four months ago, I asked why did they choose Portland as the home base for Lunarr, why not Silicon Valley? After all, there are many companies moving to Silicon Valley every day/week to become part of the great conversation that goes on here.

They said that Portland allowed them to think.

Yes, I know it’s in the headline, too. I get that. I’m just a little dense. Apparently, I need more time to think.

The post also touches on Portland on Fire, Raven Zachary’s side project that introduces us to one interesting Portlander a day. A side project which, coincidentally, is always looking for new folks to profile. So head on over there, and participate.

To read the post in its entirety—and to learn why Portland may be a better place for startups than the Valley—visit “Portland’s High Tech Community And The Space To Think

LUNARR landing

After operating for two years in stealth mode, LUNARR stepped into the light, last night, unveiling its collaboration-oriented product offering to a crowd of bloggers and other interested parties in its hometown, Portland, Oregon.

For a week where all tech eyes seem to be on the little Arrington-Calacanis get-together down south, LUNARR is pulling down some pretty impressive coverage.

As always, I’ll work to roundup all of the posts that I can. Here’s what I’ve found, so far:

If you’ve written about LUNARR, and I’ve (inadvertently) missed your post, link it up in the comments below. I’ll make sure to add it to this list.For more on LUNARR, see the product descriptions on the LUNARR site.

Reminder: LUNARR preview tonight

Bringing two years of stealth to a close, LUNARR, the Portland-based company founded on the premise that every knowledge worker in an organization has the potential to be a creative contributor, will unveil its Web-based collaboration product, this evening, at CubeSpace. The event starts at 6:00 PM.

What should you expect to see?

LUNARR is a service that allows people to create and share documents in an efficient and convenient way. As a member, once you login you can create or access a document, and then revise or simply share the document with whomever you like. Share a report with a colleague. Change a contract with your attorney. LUNARR makes it fast and simple.

LUNARR was founded by wildly successful Japanese entrepreneur Toru Takasuka of Cybozu fame. Takasuka is scheduled to present, as is LUNARR Chief Operating Officer, Hideshi Hamaguchi.

For more information on the event or to RSVP, please visit the Upcoming page.

Uncloaking: LUNARR

Apparently, Wednesday is the “Announce the events I’d really like to attend yet upon which I will inevitably be forced to bail” Day at Silicon Florist. Here’s another one:

Portland-based LUNARR, which has gotten quite a bit of press for a company in stealth mode, is disengaging its cloaking device on September 17 at CubeSpace.

LUNARR was founded by wildly successful Japanese entrepreneur Toru Takasuka of Cybozu fame:

LUNARR was founded in January of 2006 in the high tech corridor of Portland, Oregon, U.S.A. The brainchild of Toru Takasuka, one of Japan’s foremost technology entrepreneurs, LUNARR was founded on the idea that every knowledge worker in an organization has the potential to be a creative contributor, one who can have a significant impact on the organization’s success by sharing his or her unique ideas and perspectives through collaboration.

What do they do? Do you not understand the concept of “stealth”? I don’t know. We’ll just have to go to the launch party, won’t we? And by “we,” I mean “you.”

For information on the launch party, see the Upcoming page.

(Hat tip to Dawn Foster)

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