Tag: Blogs

What are the top 20 Portland blogs?

Where are all of these Portland bloggers blogs?I was digging around on PostRank after reading a great post on the PostRank Newsroom by my favorite Vice President of a Blog, Marshall Kirkpatrick. And that digging lead me to a little gem: the list of the top blogs in Portland, Oregon.

So who’s currently in the top 20? I’m glad you asked.

Here’s how the top 20 blogs in Portland are looking this week:

  1. KATU
  2. Jack Bog’s Blog
  3. Blazers Blog – OregonLive.com
  4. KGW.com Local News
  5. Our PDX
  6. The Portland Tribune – News
  7. Dave Knows: Portland
  8. PORTLAND NEWS – Google Blog Search
  9. Trail Post – A Portland Trail…
  10. Around the Sun
  11. msnbc.com: KGW
  12. Portland Transport
  13. Front Porch – Portland Real Estate
  14. KATU – Sports – Local Sports
  15. Portland Acupuncture Blog
  16. Asheville NC concerts [WTF?]
  17. Portland News
  18. About.com Portland, OR
  19. Metroblogging Portland
  20. The Portland Tribune – Jaynes

Wait a second. Those are actually feeds. (But I knew if I put “feeds” in the headline you probably wouldn’t read this.) So let’s whittle down the list to actual blogs:

  1. Jack Bog’s Blog
  2. Blazers Blog – OregonLive.com
  3. Our PDX
  4. Dave Knows: Portland
  5. Trail Post
  6. Around the Sun
  7. Portland Transport
  8. Front Porch – Portland Real Estate
  9. Portland Acupuncture Blog
  10. Metroblogging Portland

Okay. So that’s more like it.

But then again. No offense to those on the list, but for as vibrant of a blogging community as we have—I mean, here’s a smattering of Portland WordPress blogs, alone—that’s a pretty damned anemic list.

So I’m going to go import an OPML file from my feed reader and start tagging those feeds appropriately. If you’re interested in seeing a more representative list of Portland (or any other Oregon or Silicon Forest) blogs on here, I’d suggest you do the same.

It would be really nice to see some more of those awesome Portland blogs I know and love making the list.

(Image courtesy of Nate Angell. Used under Creative Commons.)

Our PDX Network: You can’t keep a good team down

Our PDXNot so long ago, there used to be a Portland team blog that I read multiple times a day. Great voices. Great insights. And a really, truly great team vibe.

They had meetups, they had banter with their readers, and—most importantly—they had Portland paying attention.

Not only did I want to read the blog, I wanted to write for them. To comment. To be part of the vibe. To be part of that team. To be part of that talent that was doing a better job of keeping Portland informed—for free. Better, in fact than many of the paid journalists in town.

And then, much to my chagrin, that blog stumbled. Badly.

And the worst part of it was that it had nothing to do with the writers, nothing to do with teamwork, and absolutely nothing to do with Portland. It had to do with the fact that they were part of a much larger network that had less concern about the Portland site than they did the network as a whole. And they made some mistakes.

And now, it seems like ages since we’ve had that vibe. The blog never recovered. They lost the team except for a few who stuck around. They lost the banter by implementing an oppressive comment system. The list goes on and on.

And since then, it’s been some irreparable shell of a blog, mocking its former instantiation, dribbling out half-hearted and insipid posts on an irregular basis.

And Portland sat. Waiting for the voices to return. Or for someone to pick up the torch.

But now, that wait is over.

Our PDX Network charts a new path

I hear you. Whoa whoa whoa, Mr. Sourpuss. Don’t start my Monday morning off on such a depressing note. Geez.

Okay.

How about this, sunshine? They’re back! Meet Our PDX. It’s going to be good, so add it to your feed reader, right now.

“Last Saturday, a local story dropped in my lap. But I had no outlet,” said Betsy Richter, the driving force behind Our PDX. “And, I got frustrated about the fact that I didn’t have much of a local presence any more (Twitter notwithstanding). So, I bought a couple of domains. And sent off email to a few people, asking for a review/feedback.”

And the rest, as they say, is history.

Now, it’s not the entire team, but it is a good chunk of the team. Richter, Dieselboi, PAgent… they’re putting the band back together.

Now bear in mind, it’s not a repeat of their former existence. This isn’t a “2.0” of the prior site, by any means. No, my friends, it promises to be better. Way better.

By Portland and for Portland, Our PDX promises to be a true hub of Portland news and happenings. You’ll see content developed by the Our PDX authors, but you’ll also see a great deal more. They’ll be working to aggregate publicly accessible media from throughout Portland, be that via Twitter streams or RSS feeds.

And they’ve really focused on getting the conversation going, again. Which is a very, very good thing.

Based on what I’ve heard about their vision, I’m excited. And I think it could really become that hub of activity for Portland that we’ve all been seeking.

Long story short, Our PDX will truly be a community blog.

I know that these folks know how to do it right. And I’m really looking forward to having them back.

Please join me in welcoming them back from their respective sabbaticals.

I can’t wait to see where this goes.

For more information, visit Our PDX and join in the conversation.

OpenID: Aaron Hockley takes a stand and you benefit

Vancouver’s Aaron Hockley is fed up.

I’m going to take a bit of a stand. Effective immediately, I will no longer comment on tech blogs that don’t support OpenID for comment authentication.

And I, for one, really respect his taking this stance. I think it’s these small, self-admittedly “mostly insignificant” kinds of actions that make things happen. The journey of 1000 miles and whatnot.

Aaron makes a strong argument for every blog pursuing its own OpenID login for comments:

OpenID is a win-win for blog comments. It’s a win for the comment author, since it means less info to type. It’s a win for the blog owner, since it means the comments have a “real” identity behind them.

I mean, if you really want to be part of the conversation, shouldn’t you make it as easy as possible for others to join in the conversation?

Of course you should. And OpenID can help you do that.

And you—as a Portlander or Silicon Forester—should be more than embracing OpenID. You should be singing its praises from the rooftops, if only to support great companies like Vidoop, ConfIdent, and JanRain who are the forefront of OpenID development.

OpenID is like the Portland Trail Blazers of technology around here. Only better. Like the ’76-’77 Blazers. That’s right. You know what I’m talking about. The plucky young upstarts who win despite all odds.

And OpenID has more than a fighting chance. But it still needs the support of each and every one of us.

But what if it’s a technical issue that’s preventing your adoption? (Like me, for instance. I wrangled my OpenID WordPress implementation for hours before Chris O’Rourke was able to pinpoint the issue and help me resolve the problem.)

Well, you don’t have that excuse anymore. Because Aaron has offered to help:

And I’ll put my time where my mouth is: I’ll help you. If you follow those links above, and can’t figure it out, or you try it and it doesn’t work. I’ll help. Send me an e-mail. I want you to have OpenID.

I’m looking forward to using my OpenID to comment on your blog the next time I swing by.

So where’s that benefit for you? Right here, tiger

In fact, how about this? Let’s round up a list of all the Silicon Forest based blogs and services that support OpenID.

If you’re one of them, use your OpenID to comment below.

I’ll work on gathering a comprehensive list for posting. And then we’ll work on promoting your blog or service for being one of the ones who’s supporting OpenID.

Just as a way—albeit minor—of saying “Thank you for using OpenID.”

Portland is Awesome, a new group blog covering the Portland scene

Portland is Awesome. Sure, sure, it’s a catch-phrase. And something we all know. But now, it’s also a blog covering Portland and its, well, “awesomeness.”

Portland is Awesome is a celebration of the many fun and interesting things in Portland, Oregon. Many of the Portland blogs just seemed too corporate, so I thought it would be cool to start a new group blog where people can blog about anything related to Portland.

It is most definitely cool. I haven’t been this happy to see a new blog come on to the scene since Portland on Fire.

Portland is Awesome will be a group blog, featuring a number of local writers. Dawn Foster, Nate Angell, and Bram Pitoyo [Update] and Sam Grover, Kathleen Mazzucco, and Justin Kistner have posted, so far. But I also noticed that more authors are wanted. (To paraphrase Aaron Hockley, “If only there were some sort of gig board around here where people could promote these positions for free by using the discount code ‘freebie.’ If only.”)

The once strong local group-blogging scene has stumbled a bit in recent months, leaving a noticeable gap in grassroots coverage of Portland’s incredible arts, entertainment, food, and culture. And that’s just one of the many reasons that Portland is Awesome (and other Portland-focused group blogs rumored to be in the works) will be a welcome addition to this much needed—and currently underserved—area.

I’m looking forward to reading this new perspective, so I’ve already added Portland is Awesome to my feeds. And I’d highly suggest you do the same.

For more information, visit Portland is Awesome.

Silicon Florist gets some sprucing

While it may not be obvious to those of you reading the feed, the Silicon Florist site has undergone some long-overdue “sprucing up” over the weekend.

Call me crazy, but it seemed like it was time to step away from the slightly tweaked default template. Because quite frankly, gentle reader, you’re worth it.

Obviously, as with all new digs, we’re still working out some of the kinks (like resurrecting the OpenID comment log-in). So your patience is appreciated. As is your feedback. We tried to implement this quickly, over the weekend. And we’ll continue to iron out the rough spots over time.

Before you start lobbing critiques (and I do appreciate the critiques), I’d encourage you to first lob congrats at Justin Kistner of Metafluence, whose Conversation theme for WordPress and design recommendations served as the foundation for the Silicon Florist redesign.

Word around the campfire is that a few other folks are already using the Conversation theme—or are preparing to implement it soon. And, I can see why. I’m still learning my way around it, but I’m really liking it so far.

A heartfelt, “Thank you,” Justin, for offering this theme up for use, sweating through the tweaking over the weekend, adding some incredibly nice features to the blog, and—last but not least—putting up with my nitpicking. I cannot thank you enough.

Hopefully, all of you will like this new direction as much as I do. I mean, I can only read my own stuff so much. So keeping you readers around—and happy—is of utmost importance.

And please, rest assured, that despite the snazzy new look, the writing around here remains fair to middling, as always. 😉

I’m looking forward to your feedback.

So, that’s that. Enough navel gazing. Without further ado, we now return you to your regularly scheduled Silicon Forest startup news, already in progress.

%d bloggers like this: