Tag: Vancouver

Hubb finds a new hub of activity

One of the most successful early stage startups in Portland isn’t actually in Portland. It’s not even in Oregon. But it is just across the river in Vancouver, Washington. So it’s definitely part of our community. That startup is Hubb. And they just moved into a new space.

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Banking on the Vancouver startup community: North Bank Innovations

Vancouver, Washington—our neighbors directly to the north—have gone by any number of names and descriptions over the years. As has the startup community in the ‘Couv’ and its supporting organizations. But all of that may change, now that they’ve revealed an identity designed to serve as the front door for the Vancouver startup community. Meet North Bank Innovations.

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More than the Rose City: Portland Startup Week 2017 features events in Beaverton and the 'Couv'

It’s almost time for another Portland Startup Week. And while it’s great to see all of the startup focused events taking place around Portland, it would be totally remiss to ignore the equally awesome see stuff that’s happening outside of the city limits, as well. Most notably, in Beaverton and Vancouver, WA. Read More

Coworking in the 'Couve': Prototype offers up shared workspace on the north shore of the Columbia

Having worked in coworking spaces for many years, I can say, with confidence, that there’s only one thing that typically prevents me from using the space as often as I should—the commute. And that’s why I’m excited to hear about a new coworking space that’s going to kill the dread commute for our neighbors to the north. Meet Prototype Coworking. Read More

With startups, it's all about the timing: Startup Weekend Vancouver (Washington) postponed

While the team, the execution, and the initial idea are important, the success or failure of most startups comes down to one thing: timing. Forcing something at the wrong time is almost worse than not doing it at all. And that’s why I’m happy to see the Startup Weekend Vancouver (Washington) team adjusting their timing. Read More

Jealous of kids getting to go to summer camps? Here's one for you: Startup Weekend Vancouver

Ah, summer camp. That time to get away from the house. To make new friends. And to spend a few moments immersed in activities that made you the person you are today. Yes, summer camp was great. But as an adult, similar opportunities are few and far between. Except when it comes to Startup Weekends. Read More

If WSU Vancouver had posted "Mt Hood" photo two days earlier, they would have seemed like comedic geniuses

So… mountains. They’re big. They’re often covered with snow. They crop up here and there in the Northwest. And if you squint just right, they can be pretty darn hard to tell apart. Or at least that’s what I’m telling myself. Because tonight, the local Twitter crowd is getting many a laugh thanks to WSU Vancouver’s Twitter account accidentally mislabeling Washington’s Mt St Helens as Oregon’s Mt Hood. Read More

Thank you

I just wanted to take a second to say “Thank you.”

I wanted to thank you for caring about what’s happening in the Silicon Forest. To thank you for keeping your eye on the Web and mobile startup scene. To thank you for giving all of the amazing developers in the area the attention they so richly deserve. To thank you for giving the entrepreneurs of Portland, Corvallis, Eugene, Bend, Ashland, Hood River, Vancouver, and all of the Oregon and Washington towns in between the opportunity to wow you with the products they’re building and the problems they’re solving.

I’m constantly reminded of how incredibly lucky I am that I get the opportunity to write about this stuff. And even luckier that you swing by to read about it. So thanks for letting me into your browser or feed reader or mobile device every once in awhile to share what people are sharing with me.

SXSW Interactive always reaffirms my belief in how lucky we are to have the community we do.

Thank you for being part of it.

Air Sharing: Vancouver iPhone app gets more than 700,000 downloads in one week

Air Sharing iPhone appEven the iPhone critics have to admit that there may something to the iPhone app thing. I mean, if the results Vancouver-based Avatron Software is producing are any indication.

Last Monday at 5 PM Pacific time, Avatron released Air Sharing, a temporarily free iPhone app that lets you treat your iPhone as a wireless hard drive. Not earth shattering news, I grant you.

But fast forward to today. And as of this writing—a few minutes shy of one week—they’re approaching nearly three-quarters of a million downloads.

That’s right more than 700,000 little versions of the Avatron apps are walking around on iPhones.

“It’s just amazing,” said Dave Howell, CEO of Avatron. “It’s way beyond what we thought would happen.”

And the reviews are looking quite positive, too. Even donpdonp might be happy with this little app, considering:

Best app in the app store. It’s incredibly useful and works with my Ubuntu desktop!… This is seriously the best app around. Worked out [of] the box, almost zero config.

Using Bonjour and the standard WebDAV interface, Air Sharing allows iPhone and iPod Touch users to mount the devices as a wireless drive on any Mac, Windows, or Linux computer; drag and drop files between the device and computers, and view documents in many common formats.

Basically, it’s like working with any other drive. Wirelessly.

But there are also some other interesting features that could extend the use of the Air Sharing app. What are those features? Well, Dave will be my guest on the next Silicon Florist podcast, so tune in to find out.

Interested in trying Air Sharing? Well, it’s free to try for one more week. After that the price will go up to $6.99.

For more information, visit the Air Sharing area on Avatron’s site. Or to see what others are saying and to try it for yourself, head on over to the Air Sharing page in the app store.

(Hat tip Raven Zachary)

Iterasi gets more social with RSS feeds, widgets, and public pages

[Editor: Full disclosure, Iterasi is a client of mine, but I was not involved in this announcement.]

http://www.iterasi.net/user/siliconflorist?format=widgetN1Vancouver-based Iterasi, the service that allows you to create your own personal Wayback Machine, took a huge step forward in making its network of users more social, today, when they announced three major additions to their offering: public pages, RSS feeds, and widgets.

Josh Lowensohn at Webware broke the news:

Web page archiving tool Iterasi is getting a small but important update Tuesday morning. Users can now share their stream of archived pages with others as an RSS feed, letting anyone view their saved items either directly in their browser or in a feed-capturing tool like Google Reader or desktop e-mail clients.

In my opinion, these seemingly innocuous changes actually mark a decided change in Iterasi’s stance. With these features, Iterasi moves from being an interesting personal service toward becoming a valuable social service. And by embracing features that allow me to distribute my saved pages to a much, much wider audience, they gain the benefit of more people encountering their service.

I have found a great deal of value in being able to save pages for myself. But now that I have the option of sharing pages with folks? It opens a whole new realm of use for me. Like a more typical social bookmarking service.

Fringe benefits abound. With RSS feeds and widgets, Iterasi just increased its exposure exponentially. I’ve added the widget to this post and I’ll likely add it to the blog (once the Mac version is out and I can use the service regularly.) And, I’m adding the RSS feed to my lifestreaming services, like FriendFeed and Strands.

What’s more, by launching public pages, Iterasi has the potential to rapidly increase its online footprint for search engines and the like—like any other public-facing social network service.

Now, it’s not all rainbows and unicorns. As with any new feature on a BETA product, there are some rough spots and some nice-to-haves that didn’t make the cut. There are some areas over which I would like to have control, like skinning the widget and dealing with the publishing function.

But as I’ve mentioned, I see this release as less about “features” and more about “vision.” It’s clear to me that Iterasi is taking a much more social stance. And that’s a very good thing.

To test drive the product, visit Iterasi. To see the public page in action or to get the widget code, please visit the Silicon Florist page on Iterasi.

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