Tag: flickr

Rose City ‘Til I Die: Portland Timbers’ Flickr photostream crowdsources PDX’s love of soccer

Now, those images of true Portland Timbers’ fans are available on the Timbers’ Flickr photostream.

[HTML2]Portland is a town of many loves. There are the obvious ones. The coffee. The beer. The food. The books. And the technology. But some folks outside the town might not be as well phrased in one of the most well-loved sports in the city: soccer. Or to be more specific: The Portland Timbers.

When billboards of “Timbers fans” began popping up all over town, there were any number of “I could do that” claims from locals. Well, the Timbers heard those claims too. And they took the opportunity to ask their fans to do just that. Now, those images of true Portland Timbers’ fans are available on the Timbers’ Flickr photostream. Read More

Portwiture: What does your Twitter stream look like?*

Portwiture helps you visualize your Twitter stream of pithy insights. But not in an old-boring-graph way. Instead, it does it by snagging photos from Flickr, the popular photo sharing site.

[HTML2]Usually when I ask “Can you see what I’m saying?” I’m just mangling the English language. But when it comes to Portwiture—a random Twitter and Flickr mashup from Portland-based designer Tyler Sticka—I’m being all too literal.

Why? Well, Portwiture helps you visualize your Twitter stream of pithy insights. But not in an old-boring-graph way. Instead, it does it by snagging photos from Flickr, the popular photo sharing site. Read More

Happy 150th Birthday, Oregon! OSU and Flickr got you a gift

Today, February 14, 2009, marks the 150th birthday of Oregon, the sesquicentennial of the fair state that the Silicon Forest calls home.

I didn’t really get you anything, Oregon. But OSU and Flickr did.

Like this photo of Beer and Blog, circa 1933.

Beer and Blog circa 1933

Well, okay. Maybe that’s more of a codefest. And it’s taking place in Virginia. But let’s not quibble.

In honor of Oregon’s birthday, Oregon State University has become the first university to contribute to the Flickr Commons.

This initial offering focuses on the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC), a New Deal program, focused on the conservation of natural resources, that targeted unemployed young men, veterans and American Indians who were hard hit by the Great Depression. The Oregon State University Archives’s photostream shows various CCC projects, which included firefighting, farm land improvements, infrastructure projects and even the building of ski areas on Mt. Hood.

The photos are just a peek into OSU’s photographic collections pertaining to the history of forestry and natural resources in the Pacific Northwest, with a focus on Oregon. Expect more uploads from the OSU Archives illustrating culture, natural resources, and history in the coming months. In the meantime, enjoy the collection!

What is the Flickr Commons? It’s a huge collection of photography shared by the world’s photography archives designed to give the public a glimpse into these valuable resources—as well as stimulate discussion among the Flickr community.

I don’t know about you, but I just added the OSU Commons as a friend on Flickr.

Mapdango mashes Digg, Flickr, FriendFeed, Wikipedia, and more into your maps

While mapping services are often one of the first places people start mucking with APIs and mashups, few take to it as well as Portland-based Cartosoft. Continuing to push the mapping mashup envelope, they’ve just announced the latest version of their award-winning flagship product, Mapdango.

Mapdango

From the Mapdango v2 post:

You spoke, emailed, and clicked – and we listened. After some relatively in-depth analysis for usage trends over the last four months or so, we custom-tailored mapdango to provide users with a better experience exploring different locations around the world.

So what’s new?

Well, what’s most important to a mashup? More stuff to mashup, of course. And Mapdango doesn’t disappoint. If it’s got an API available and some GIS info, it’s likely that it’s on Mapdango, now.

The Google Maps based tool now includes travel books from Amazon, news from Google News, weather from WeatherBug, photos from Panoramio, videos from YouTube, articles from Wikipedia, country demographic information from the US Census Bureau, geotagged Flickr photos, events from Eventful, social connections via Google Friend Connect (Mapdango was one of the early beta testers of the Friend Connect service), related news from Digg, links from FriendFeed, and “a whole bunch” of social bookmarking links.

To make things a little easier to digest, the single view map has now been split into three separate views: a dashboard, a map view, and a social view.

What’s more, they’ve added the ability to string queries through a URL, making it easier to bookmark and perform quick lookups:

We have made it even easier to add dynamic location links to mapdango. Simply add a URL-escaped location to the following URL, and mapdango will search for a location: http://www.mapdango.com/location.php?q=. For example, to search for Portland, Oregon, you would create a link to http://www.mapdango.com/location.php?q=Portland+Oregon.

All in all, this feature-rich release marks another leap forward for Mapdango and Cartosoft. And it serves as a positive reminder to the industry that—with the continued proclivity toward open data exchange—individuals hold the power to accumulate and manage tons of data within a single resource.

To try it for yourself, visit Mapdango. For more on the latest release, see the Mapdango v2 release post on the Cartosoft blog.

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