Tag: Bookmarklet

I want to buy this. At this price. Tell me when that happens. Salemarked does, simply and elegantly

Enter Salemarked. A Web browser bookmarklet that allows users to select a specific item, set the price at which they would buy that item, and request an alert when that item actually reaches that sale price.

There are always the stories. You know. About the startups that made it. That cashed out big. That spawned another hundred startups. But what about the ones that fail? What do they spawn? Well, if it’s Oklahoma transplant Vidoop—which had a much celebrated move to Portland followed by a spectacular flame out—the answer is quite a bit.

Without the fall of Vidoop, there might not have been Bac’n, Urban Airship, What Spot Now, or some excellent design work at Spotlight Mobile. And there might not have been the latest project from former-Vidooper Koes Bong, a little project called Salemarked. Read More

Fear of (bookmark) commitment? Try I Need to Read This

I Need to Read ThisWe’ve all been there. There’s that one article that you need to remember to read. You simply don’t have time to read it, right now. And you’re not sure if you’re going to want it after you’re done reading it.

In short, you can’t commit to saving it to your bookmarks because you’re not sure if it’s bookmark material, yet.

Currently, I have a system set up in Evernote that involves a lot of clipping and organizing—and then reading and deleting—to manage my list of “read this later.” Honestly, it takes a bit of effort to simply remind myself to go back and read a particular page. And the Evernote saving process has a couple of steps to it.

Portland’s own Marshall Kirkpatrick, vice president of a blog called ReadWriteWeb and one with quite an appetite for consuming online content, has a delicious tag called “toread” that he uses to manage his “I’ll get to this later” list.

There has to be a better way. And as we all know, it’s usually the simple—and well implemented—ideas that can have the most impact.

Enter Portland-based I Need to Read This.

I saw I Need to Read This demoed at a recent Portland Web Innovators Demolicious, and I was blown away by how drop dead simple—and incredibly effective—the tool could be.

I Need to Read This is about as simple as you can get. Just register (either with a username and password or with OpenID) and add a I Need to Read This bookmarklet to you Web browser toolbar. That means it works for any browser—unlike a Firefox add-in (and since I generally run Camino, I’m addicted to bookmarklets).

The next time you’re browsing content and you come across a page you need to read? Simply click the bookmarklet and the page will be added to your list things you need to read.

Have a free minute to catch up on your reading? There’s another bookmarklet that will take you to the first item on your list of things to read.

So simple. Yet so effective.

Don’t trust me? What about Webware?

What’s nice about I Need to Read This is that you can use all of its services through bookmarklets instead of having to install anything in your browser. There’s simply “I Need to Read This” and “Read an Article” bookmarklets, which you drag up to your browser’s toolbar, and on any story you want to bookmark you just hit the former bookmarklet to save it. Then, to read what you have saved you click the latter “Read an Article” button, which takes you to the latest story. Clicking it again takes you to the second most recent, and so on.

Or maybe that little blog called Lifehacker?

We love the previously mentioned Read It Later Firefox extension, which offers a simple method for saving bookmarks to read later. The I Need to Read This bookmarklet offers similar functionality without the extension dependence.

I Need to Read This even made Techmeme.

Can I get a “Yay Portland!”?

This is just an early start for the tool created by Benjamin Stover and Jason Grlicky, but it’s got all the functionality you need to get started.

For more information or to register for an account, visit I Need to Read This or follow them on Twitter.

[HTML1]

Iterasi unveils bookmarklet, glimpse into potential for Web archive

[Full disclosure: Iterasi is a client of mine. I was briefed on these features while they were in development and I was involved in on-going consulting as they came to fruition. I recommend you read this post with that grain of salt in mind.]

IterasiPortland-based Iterasi is on a mission to save the Web from extinction. Or at least the Web page at which you’re looking right at this moment. So they keep coming up with ways for you to save Web pages—in all of their functional HTML glory—as quickly and easily as possible.

First came the toolbar, then the Firefox add-in, and now there’s the Iterasi bookmarklet, which allows users to save pages without installing anything. To try it out, click on the link below and you’ll see how it works. (And if you want to take it with you, simply drag-and-drop it to your bookmarks bar.)

Archive to iterasi

In addition to the new bookmarklet, Iterasi has done more organizing to make their archive of Web pages for accessible and digestible. Tags are more prevalent and usable. And there’s a search function.

What’s more, one of their new views of the archive could prove to be pretty interesting. It’s akin to the Internet Archive Wayback Machine. Kind of a people-powered version of the Internet Archive’s version.

You save a page, make it public, and it winds up on the archive page for that site. Just the push of a button and you’ve made history. Or at least saved it for everyone to see. And while there’s not much there now, this has the potential to become a valuable resource for everyone. A sort of Wikipedia-esque archive of the Web.

For more on the new features, see Iterasi’s post. To test drive the products or search the archive, visit Iterasi.

 

 

%d bloggers like this: