Tag: Eugene

OsoEco shuts down

OsoEcoI’m sorry to have to report that Eugene-based OsoEco—a site focused on socially responsible shopping that was in the running to win Angel Oregon last year—has announced it is closing its doors and shutting down its site at the end of this month.

The site never made it out of beta.

Community members received the following email on Saturday:

Hello OsoEco Community:

I’d like to start off this e-mail saying how much all of us here at OsoEco have appreciated your time, insights and patience over the last 18-24 months while we’ve worked to continue building our “healthy social shopping” community. We had been diligently trying to raise more funds from investors to enable us to finish building our Web site; however, we were not able to secure any additional funding. As a result we will be disabling osoeco.com on March 30, 2009.

This deeply saddens all of us at OsoEco. We realize that if it wasn’t for each of you joining our community/adding valuable content that we would not have gotten as far as we have.Your belief in creating a community of people that enjoy helping each other find the healthiest solutions is the real reason why we started OsoEco. Thank you for the the time and energy you put into adding content to OsoEco. We know that OsoEco would have become a trusted source for people to exchange healthy ideas and solutions.

We’d like to take this opportunity and suggest a few online communities that we feel share our values for fostering a business that focuses on personal and/or planetary wellness. If you’re not already members of these communities I encourage you to consider joining them:

Greenlane (Lane County, OR)
“A business network providing education, resources, networking, and marketing for sustainability. Join our community of Lane County businesses, non-profits and individuals and share sustainable ideas and practices.”

Sustainlane (Global)
“The web’s largest people-powered guide to sustainable living. SustainLane.com is filled with personal accounts of how-tos, news, and local business and product reviews for sustainable living.”
NOTE: Our former (and amazing) Community Manager, Cris Bisch <mailto:cris@sustainlane.com> , is now on the SustainLane team. I highly recommend you connect with her if you’d like to talk about “green” products and services. She is a wealth of knowledge!

EcoMetro (Portland, OR; Seattle, WA; Minneapolis/St Paul, MN; and East Bay, CA)
“EcoMetro guides provide great resources and several hundred coupons for products and services that have reduced environmental impacts.”

Helia (Global)
“Healia is the premier consumer health search engine for finding high quality and personalized health information on the Web. It serves as an independent, unbiased gateway to the highest quality health information resources.”

Thank you again for being a part of this exciting ride with us! We look forward to crossing paths with each of you out there in both the real and virtual worlds of sustainability/health & wellness.

Enjoy life!

Sincerely,

Caroline Cummings | CEO/Co-founder
(please feel free to connect with me on Facebook – search for “Caroline Cummings Eugene”)

Katie Wilson-Hamaker | President/Co-founder
(please feel free to connect with me on Facebook or GreenLane
<http://www.greenlane-sbn.org/>

Beer and Blog says “Konnichiwa!” to Tokyo and “Hello!” to Houston and Phoenix

Beer and BlogBeer and Blog, the weekly Portland get-together started by Justin Kistner, was been growing by leaps and bounds.

What kinds of leaps and bounds? I’m glad you asked.

Currently there is Beer and Blog Portland, Beer and Blog Corvallis, Beer and Blog Eugene, Beer and Blog St Louis, and Beer and Blog Las Vegas.

But does it stop there? Oh no, my friend. Not by a long shot.

Tonight on Strange Love Live, Justin announced the launch of Beer and Blog chapters in Houston, Phoenix, and—with its first international chapter—Tokyo.

Sniff sniff. Our little Beer and Blog is all growed up.

Congratulations to Justin, his Portland-based team, and all of the chapter leads! It’s great to see something that has so strengthened the Portland tech community getting the chance to work its magic in other towns.

YottaByte Group: The future for Oregon tech education

When I first sat down with Derek Brandow and Jason Gallic of Eugene-based (but hopefully making the move to Portland) YottaByte Group, I didn’t know quite what to expect. And by the time we said our good-byes, I was shaking my head in disbelief.

And since that time I’ve been struggling to get this post written. Struggling because of that—literally jaw-dropping—disbelief.

Disbelief that something so obviously right, necessary, and critical for our community—and the future of our communities—hasn’t already been done. Disbelief that these guys would have any difficulty finding funding for something that promises to change the future of technology in Oregon and, likely, the rest of the world. Disbelief that educators everywhere wouldn’t be clamoring for this model to help students.

To put it bluntly, the conversation was quite the “Well… duh!” moment for me. Why wouldn’t everyone be behind this thing? Why aren’t we doing this already?

So what’s this exceedingly obvious—yet heretofore untapped—idea that makes YotttaByte such a winner in my book?

Well, to put it simply, they’re rethinking the educational system—especially as it relates to innovation and technology—in today’s K-12 environment:

The current model for both public and private schools has not changed significantly in the last 100 years. The longevity of that model is a testament to the greatness of its 20th century design. However, the design is beginning to crumble….

The time is now to create the schools we are going to need for our children to thrive (not merely survive) in the 21st century.

And the YottaByte team has a compelling vision for how this might occur.

From my admittedly ignorant standpoint, I see it falling somewhere between the concept of alternative schools and the traditional gifted and talented programs.

Like an art student focusing on painting or a musical student focusing on an instrument, YottaByte students would work in an environment that allows them to focus on technology and innovation.

Once up and running, YottaByte promises to create intensive and collaborative schools that help these students exercise their artistic talent—in this case an artistic talent that manifests itself as problem solving and technical discovery—with students around the world.

In their own words, YottaByte will be:

Preparing children for collaboration, innovation, and contribution in a global marketplace.

Hearing them tell it, it’s a compelling vision for how technology could—and arguably should—be approached if today’s students are to get the kind of technical grounding they’re going to need to manage the sheer bulk of digital information and power at their feet. And to wring every last ounce of potential out of the collaborative technologies we have at our disposal. To get the right people fixing the problems. Not just the people who happen to be there.

It’s a pretty powerful concept, and one in whose Kool-Aid I have deeply imbibed. Because what YottaByte is proposing is not only a brilliant idea, it’s just the right thing to do.

I’m looking forward to continuing my coverage of YottaByte’s progress as they continue pitching this story and building out their proof-of-concept schools.

It’s going to be an interesting ride.

For more information on the YottaByte Group and their vision for technology education, visit YottaByte Group.

%d bloggers like this: