May 6th, 2008

Iterasi: Get your own personal Wayback Machine


[Full discloure: Iterasi is a client of mine. I worked with them a great deal on the initial announcement of their product in February, but aside from some ad hoc consultation, I did not participate in this launch.]

Vancouver-based Iterasi, the service that allows you to run your own personal Wayback Machine, has come out of private BETA and announced general availability for the Windows version of their browser toolbar. Using the toolbar, you gain the ability to capture an entire Web page, exactly as you see it—dynamic elements and all—and save it in that state, forever.

Sound interesting? Head over to the site to register and download your Iterasi toolbar.

The team has added some compelling features since the last time I wrote about the product back in February. Most notably the ability to embed captured pages within Web pages.

I’ve posted one of my favorite examples—the ability to save a Google search for future reference—below.

As you’ll see from the embedded page, Iterasi saves the entire Web page as fully functional HTML, including any AJAX wackiness or completed form fields. In many ways, it’s the evolution of bookmarking. Moving from saving the location of a Web page to saving the Web page, itself.

But even that description might not give you a full feel for the potential of the product. So, if you’re a Windows user or have access to Windows on your Mac, I’d encourage you to download it and give it a shot.

The Mac version of Iterasi’s toolbar is still under development.

For more information, visit Iterasi.

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3 Responses to “Iterasi: Get your own personal Wayback Machine”

  1. [...] may remember Iterasi as the service that I touted as “giving you your own personal Wayback Machine.” That functionality showed a great deal of promise—but it didn’t promise a great [...]

  2. [...] you it is one of my favorite internet apps ever.  Rick Turoczy described it best when he called it “your own personal Wayback Machine”.   Admittedly, I haven’t used it much lately, but that’s going to change.  I mostly [...]

  3. [...] may remember Iterasi as the service that I touted as “giving you your own personal Wayback Machine.” That functionality showed a great deal of promise—but it didn’t promise a great [...]


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