Tag: Launch

The most wonderful ecommerce time of the year just got more wonderful. Thanks to Public Market.

You have to love Public Market. They’re very much an atypical startup for the Portland area. They’re swinging for the fences as they work to build an ecommerce platform that’s designed to — wait for it — kill Amazon. Yes. That Amazon. And as if that’s not difficult enough? They decided to launch their platform to the public on Cyber Monday, the most server meltingest of days in ecommerce.

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Reassessing your launch strategy? Jackson Gariety provides some food for thought

It seems almost trite now. For the last few years, launching products—or the promise of products—has been a series of: 1) Get a tech blog to cover it, 2) Hope it hits Hacker News or Techmeme, 3) ????, and of course 4) Profit! So it’s always nice to see young Portland entrepreneurs like Jackson Gariety re-evaluating this process. Read More

Get ready to get Cozy

While seeing new companies start and grow in Portland is amazing, having awesome companies decide to open up offices here is pretty darn cool, too. So when Cozy said they were opening a Portland office, I was pretty excited. Now, I’m even more excited because Cozy is live. Read More

REMINDER: Signalfy launch party at Holocene, Wednesday evening *cough* open bar *cough*

It’s always nice when new startups come to town. It’s even nicer when they offer to buy you a drink. And that’s what’s happening Wednesday, April 17, at the Signalfy launch party. Read More

Looking for all of the hot spots? Well, spotsi’s launch party is the spot to be

If there’s one downside to Portland’s aggressive humility, it’s our reticence to celebrate our victories. Funding, launches, big customer wins.

But some of that is starting to change. And here’s one example: spotsi is opening up their public beta. And to celebrate? They’re throwing a launch party on Thursday. Even better? You’re invited. Read More

Nozzl Media launches a widget that hints at future real-time products

One of the most cryptic and stealthy startups around here lately has been Nozzl. We knew it had something to do with controlling and managing the firehose of information on the Web in real-time.

[HTML4]One of the most cryptic and stealthy startups around here lately has been Nozzl Media. We knew some of the people who were working on it. Really smart people like Steve Woodward and Brian Hendrickson. And we knew it had something to do with controlling and managing the firehose of information on the Web—in real-time.

But beyond that, we had very little hint of exactly what the Nozzl folks were doing. That is, until today. Read More

REMINDER: Like the electronica? Make sure to head to the Mugasha launch party tonight

As you may have read in my previous gushing, Portland Startup Weekend graduate Mugasha launched this week. And what’s a great launch without a great launch party? Well, it’s a great launch. But it’s still cool to have a launch party.

And that’s just what the Mugasha folks are doing. Tonight. So if you’re a fan of electronica and you’re looking for something to do this evening, join Mugasha at Rontoms tonight to celebrate. Read More

REMINDER: Communit.as launch party, tonight

Communit.asIt’s always good to see new Silicon Forest based products being launched—especially when there’s a launch party involved. So, don’t forget that Communit.as will be unveiling their product, tonight.

What’s Communit.as? According to the founders, it’s an “open source web application that provides a foundation for building custom community and social network sites.”

That’s about all I’ve got, because I haven’t seen it yet, either.

Oh okay. Here are some other details:

There are certain core features any community or social network site needs: user accounts, access control, database abstraction, template rendering and a few other essentials. While you could certainly build these things from scratch every time you build a site, this seems like kind of a waste of effort to us. With that in mind we set out to create a reusable, upgradeable foundation that can shave the first few weeks of development off of any custom community site.

“Custom” is really the operative word there. Communit.as is generally intended for building sites with lots of custom functionality. Instead starting with the functionality we think you want and forcing you to hack the crap out of it, we take care of the tedious stuff and give you a great set of tools for adding your own features. If you want a generic blog or a social network that does everything out of the box, there are better solutions for those things.

This isn’t to say you don’t get a running application out of the box. You do. We provide a simple and robust installer that will have you up and running in minutes.

So if you’re intrigued, make sure to show up at CubeSpace, this evening from 6-8. There will be drinks, snacks, and demos galore.

For more information, visit the Communit.as launch party on Upcoming or Calagator.

Iterasi: Get your own personal Wayback Machine

[Full discloure: Iterasi is a client of mine. I worked with them a great deal on the initial announcement of their product in February, but aside from some ad hoc consultation, I did not participate in this launch.]

Vancouver-based Iterasi, the service that allows you to run your own personal Wayback Machine, has come out of private BETA and announced general availability for the Windows version of their browser toolbar. Using the toolbar, you gain the ability to capture an entire Web page, exactly as you see it—dynamic elements and all—and save it in that state, forever.

Sound interesting? Head over to the site to register and download your Iterasi toolbar.

The team has added some compelling features since the last time I wrote about the product back in February. Most notably the ability to embed captured pages within Web pages.

I’ve posted one of my favorite examples—the ability to save a Google search for future reference—below.

http://www.iterasi.net/embedded/?sqrlitid=_usQPoEYdU6mizC1xaJXOQ

As you’ll see from the embedded page, Iterasi saves the entire Web page as fully functional HTML, including any AJAX wackiness or completed form fields. In many ways, it’s the evolution of bookmarking. Moving from saving the location of a Web page to saving the Web page, itself.

But even that description might not give you a full feel for the potential of the product. So, if you’re a Windows user or have access to Windows on your Mac, I’d encourage you to download it and give it a shot.

The Mac version of Iterasi’s toolbar is still under development.

For more information, visit Iterasi.

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