Month: June 2009

Are you listed in the Silicon Florist wiki?

We all realize that there’s a ton of stuff happening in town. New startups, exciting side projects, crazy cool events. And every day it seems like we’re learning about more and more opportunities to draw the community together—or cool new technologies to test drive.

This leads to two issues. First, how do we keep track of all this stuff? And second, how do we filter all of this stuff?

Silicon Florist wiki to the rescue, my friends! Well or you can refer to it by its more common name: AboutUs. Read More

Toonlet enables creation of Becker Street, the Kindle comic book

It’s no secret that part of the magic of this generation of Web startups is the whole social aspect of what’s happening. And while, no doubt, that’s a big component of what we see occurring, there’s something more important that’s often overlooked: enabling.

Web 2.0 is all about enabling. Enabling you to do things that would be practically impossible without the technology. Things like enabling you to find what you want when you want it. Enabling you to broadcast your opinion to the world, quickly and easily. And enabling you to do things like build comics and release Kindle books. Read More

Top 25 Silicon Florist posts for May 2009

I don’t know about you, but it seems that lately we’ve been flying through the content here at the ol’ Silicon Florist. Tons of stuff happening. Some of it good. Some of it bad.

I’m not egotistical enough to think that you’re hanging on every word I post here—except for you, Mom. So I thought I’d take the opportunity to round up the most popular stories that have been posted to Silicon Florist in May 2009. Read More

Awesome women in tech: Selena Deckelmann and Audrey Eschright

A incredibly insightful woman once said, “Encourage your community to take time to step back and enjoy their work.” And since I just read her saying that today, I thought I would stop for a second to emphasize just how lucky we are to have the community we do. We’ve got events going every night and practically every weekend. We’ve got good chatter online and off. And we’re creating and building a lot of cool stuff—sometimes purely through volunteer efforts.

Two of those amazing volunteer projects are Calagator and Open Source Bridge. And two of the awesome people behind those efforts are Selena Deckelmann and Audrey Eschright. Read More

Mugasha adds a slew of new sets

If you’re into electronica, you’re likely a heavy podcast consumer—a great way to get a ton of new tunes to fill your library. But there’s one major issue with that format: like the live sets, DJ podcasts are a single unbroken stream of music—often hours on end—with no way to determine which songs are which and who’s being sampled.

Enter Portland-based Mugasha—arguably the most successful service to come out of Portland Startup Weekend. Mugasha slices and dices DJ sets into consumable—and intelligible—chunks, making it easier on the listener and providing more promotional opportunities for the DJs.

I’ve been a huge fan of Mugasha and the DJs they’ve had since their launch. But the pool of available music had been growing a little stagnant. Until today. Read More

Ignite Portland 6: Who’s got the burning ideas this time?

From the sounds of things, choosing presentations for Ignite Portland 6 was a bit of a doozy. But the Ignite Portland team managed to soldier on and select a group of presenters to take the stage on July 16.

There were almost 70 proposals—and all of them were really good. So who made the cut? Read More

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