Category: CubeSpace

Portland: Soaring unemployment and soaring numbers of young creatives continue to confound media

We seem to be a complete enigma to the media. No one can quite to put their finger on why young creatives continue to flock to Portland even though the Oregon unemployment rate continues to soar.

We seem to be a complete enigma to the media. No one can quite to put their finger on why young creatives continue to flock to Portland even though the Oregon unemployment rate continues to soar.

Still, journalist are exercising a fair amount of schadenfreude while covering the inexorable influx—by focusing on the downside of our current environment. Like the unemployment. And the hiccups and black eyes of Portland startups. Read More

REMINDER: CubeSpace farewell party tonight

Come join David, Eva, and the CubeSpace staff to say goodbye to the Portland coworking space that has launched a thousand Camps.

Obviously, I’ve been following the whole CubeSpace story—from the efforts to save it to the final decision to close—with morose interest. And now, it’s time to say the final farewell. Since it’s still not clear what’s happening with the rumored resurrection of CubeSpace, today marks the farewell party for the beloved hub of the Portland startup tech scene.

Come join David, Eva, and the CubeSpace staff to say goodbye to the coworking space that has launched a thousand Camps. Read More

CubeSpace: Resurrection?

While it’s not exactly clear what’s happening, CubeSpace—the local co-working space that has served as the communal campfire for the Portland tech community—is hinting at a potential last minute rescue. “Not dead yet,” said the CubeSpace folks via their Twitter account. “Having serious conversations re:@CubeSpacePDX return!” Read More

CubeSpace coda

Communities need campfires around which to gather. Whether they be meeting places to tell stories, warm safe places to meet friends, or roaring bonfires to celebrate our victories. Or even—at times—simply a place to Camp. CubeSpace was the campfire of the Portland tech community. And now its flame is out.

[HTML3]I was dreading writing this post. But somehow, given the state of things, it seemed—barring a miracle—that it was inevitable. And so it was, this evening, that the story we’ve all be following and anxiously awaiting, finally came to its unfortunate conclusion: CubeSpace is no more.

Communities need campfires around which to gather. Whether they be meeting places to tell stories, warm safe places to meet friends, or roaring bonfires to celebrate our victories. Or even—at times—simply a place to Camp.

CubeSpace was the campfire of the Portland tech community. And now its flame is out. Read More

Save CubeSpace: Rounding up the conversations while we wait for more details [Updated]

As last week drew to a close, the Portland tech community was rallying to help the de facto hub of our community, CubeSpace.

The fervent out-welling of emotion and support continued throughout the weekend—even resulting in coverage from traditional mainstream media.

While there isn’t a great to deal more to report at this point—and Eva and David are understandably choosing to remain silent until a decision has been made—I’ve been getting a number of emails, IMs, and tweets about the issue. So I thought I’d round up what I could. Read More

Save CubeSpace

Well, this is the last thing I expected on this Frenetic Friday. But it seems that arguably the de facto hub of the Portland startup tech scene, CubeSpace, is unfortunately in dire straits.

While we’re still not clear on the specifics dollar amounts involved in the situation, it is clear that the folks at CubeSpace are facing eviction. Read More

Our favorite Portland coworking spaces get some love from The Oregonian

Coworking in The OregonianIt’s no secret that I started Silicon Florist to highlight some of the “under the RADAR” stories that might not garner coverage from traditional local publications.

So, when the mainstream pubs around town cover the stories I’d like to cover—and cover them before I do—it makes me ridiculously happy.

Today’s case in point: coworking spaces in Portland:

Several vintage Portland buildings have been renovated recently, blurring the line between co-working and traditional offices. Small creative entrepreneurs have office doors, but they share common areas and, sometimes, business.

Among the folks mentioned are some of our favorite coworking spaces in town.

Like who?

Well, CubeSpace, for one:

CubeSpace hosts evening events, including tech clubs and Beer & Blog gatherings. Schweber and Kominsky sometimes sweep through at 9:15 — quarter-past quitting time — and urge the crowd to move to a bar.

Souk for another:

When Julie Duryea opened Souk 2 1/2 years ago, cafes were the only choice for most freelancing Portlanders. She couldn’t find many co-working spaces beyond New York and London.

Now, her Old Town operation hosts an eclectic crowd: a footwear and apparel consultant, a strategic planner, a retail designer. Plus, Souk has company in the Portland market.

And up-and-coming Nedspace:

They recruit tenants through online networking, word of mouth and a startup event they hosted last month. Early residents are developing iPhone applications, an online rental payment service, board games, interactive music content and more. Some have started companies; others are first-timers.

If you haven’t checked out these coworking spaces, you should. Not only are they do they provide an amazing resource to our startup community, they serve as the warm little hub around which many of us gather.

And their continued willingness to support our events—often pro bono—is without a doubt a key to the burgeoning startup community with which we find ourselves enamoured.

For more, see The Oregonian article “Co-working: a room not of their own” by Laura Oppenheimer.

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REMINDER: From Side Project to Startup starts up tonight

Whew! We’re drawing near to the finish on an event-filled week. And now, From Side Project to Startup will be leading us into the weekend.

What’s the focus? Selena Deckelmann gives us the lowdown:

If you were at Barcamp Portland, you may have stopped by for the My Other Thing session. (if you weren’t there you can listen to this recording of a great, freewheeling discussion) The session led by Rick Turoczy and Banana Lee Fishbones. After the group separated, people talked about wanting more – more discussions, more connections… maybe even – a conference! Inspired by that session, From Side Project to Startup was born.

Things kick off around 5:30 PM at CubeSpace, with a welcome reception.

Here’s the full agenda:

Friday Evening – September 12, 2008
5:30-6:30 – Reception/Networking
6:30-7:00 – Welcome and setting the stage
7:00-9:00 – Creative Entrepreneurship: Conception to Actualization – Bridget Benton of Eyes Aflame
7:00-9:00 – Unconference Sessions

Saturday – September 13, 2008
9:00-10:00 – Coffee, Bagels and Schmoozing
10:00-10:15 – Welcome
10:30-12:00 – What to Do Before You Quit Your Day Job – Mark Paul
10:30-12:00 – Unconference Sessions
12:00-1:30 – Lunch
1:30-3:00 – One Page Startup Marketing Plan – Peter Korchnak of Semiosis Communications
1:30-3:00 – Unconference Sessions
3:00-3:30 – Snack Break
3:30-5:00 – What Kind of Funding are You Eligible For? – Carolynn Duncan
5:00-5:15 – Wrap Up
5:15-??? – After Party

As you can see, the format is fairly open. With lots of time to jump in and out. So, even if you can’t make it to the whole thing, I’m hoping you’ll take the chance to swing by and participate. That is, if the subject matter interests you.

And something tells me that it does.

The event is brought to you by Legion of Tech, an Oregon nonprofit dedicated to helping grow and nurture the local Portland technology community through educational, not-for-profit, community-run events.

For more information on the event, visit From Side Project to Startup. To RSVP, visit Upcoming.

Looking forward to seeing you there.

Just a Cozy Lunch with Rick

And 200 of his closest friends.

According to Eva, that was the count for yesterday’s sixth installment of Portland Lunch 2.0 hosted at CubeSpace by our good friend Rick Turoczy, a.k.a. the Silicon Florist.

Rick had reason to celebrate because this blog is now one year old, which is like 10 human years or something. Anyway, Rick’s hospitality brought out the largest crowd yet for a Portland Lunch 2.0. The event was really inspiring for me, as the Lunch 2.0 guy, and for Rick, as the guy everyone came out to see.

At most points during the lunch, there was a line three to six people deep to talk to Rick. Bram and I joked that he needed a “Now Serving” sign to keep track of who was next in line. Rick was so busy chatting up his guests, he forgot to eat. That’s why we all like him so much though. Because he doesn’t eat much.

Anyway, enough about Rick. Other highlights.

  • Nicholas catered the lunch, always a good day when you eat Nicholas, especially for free.
  • There was a Marshall Kirkpatrick sighting. He even blogged while he was there, simultaneously standing on one leg, eating, chatting with two people and doing his taxes.
  • I got to see about half the people I follow on Twitter IRL, and I met several new people including a bunch interested in keeping the Lunch 2.0 train rolling.
  • Ryan Snyder of recently launched Shizzow and his fellow Shizzites (Dawn, Mark and Sam) introduced their new service and handed out a bunch of beta invites.
  • A good time was had by all, even Rick.

All-in-all, it was a highly successful and entertaining lunch. Thanks to all who made it. Thanks to Rick for picking up the lunch tab. Thanks to Eva and CubeSpace for providing the space. Thanks to you for reading all the way to here. Keep going, there’s more.

In typical Portland fashion, the party didn’t stop at 2 when Lunch 2.0 ended. Shizzow hosted their first Shizzup at the Green Dragon (on the brand new patio and place for Beer and Blog this Friday). After that you had to choose between the monthly game of Werewolf and Back Fence PDX. Someone should have hired a party bus. This is one (of many) things I love about Portland. Always so much to do.

Anyway, if you love Lunch 2.0, there are more on the schedule. We’ll be at SplashCast on September 17; please only RSVP if you’ll be there for sure because the space is a bit small. And then, on October 15, the Art Institute of Portland opens its doors to Lunch 2.0. RSVP on Upcoming.

I have a definite date for November and several solids for the next few months. So, it looks like we’ll keep this thing going for a while; maybe I’ll pencil Rick in for another Silicon Florist birthday party/Lunch 2.0 next August.

Can’t believe it was that much fun? Or maybe you want balanced coverage? Check out a few other accounts of the Lunch 2.0 and Silicon Florist birthday that was.

Photo courtesy of Aaron Hockley used under Creative Commons.

Meet: Portland Coders’ Bash 2007

In which language do you code? Ruby? PHP? Perl? C#? SQL? HTML? BASIC? COBOL? VAX/VMS? Something more obscure than that?

Tell you what, it doesn’t really matter. You could code in VisualBasic for Applications or Actionscript for all I care.

Why? Because a coder is a coder is a coder. Call yourself an engineer or developer or coder or whatever. We’re all the same.

And that’s why it’s so cool to stumble upon something like the Portland Coders’ Bash. It’s an event where any coder, regardless of language, can get together with other coders.

This December Multiple Portland programming users groups are going to combine meeting into on large meeting. This will be a socializing, festive atmosphere meant to allow the local group members to get to know each other a bit better.

The event is planned for December 11 at CubeSpace. For more information, see the see the PDX Groups wiki.

(Hat tip Selena)

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