Category: Community

Ensuring inclusivity in the growing Portland Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality community

It’s no secret that the Portland startup community has more than its fair share of virtual reality and augmented reality activity. But it’s only going to be a truly interesting, compelling, and vibrant with a variety of voices and experiences. That’s why it’s awesome to see folks like Kerri Lynne Thorp who are working to ensure that everyone feels welcome in this burgeoning community.

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If you have difficulty falling asleep, perhaps my babble about the Portland startup community will help

Any number of you have had the misfortune of being stuck in a room, listening to me babble about my opinions on the Portland startup community. It happens. And yes, you feel uncomfortable getting up and walking out. I get it. But for whatever reason, I still get invited to talk about Portland startup stuff on a regular basis. And again, for whatever reason, folks even record this sometimes.

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Craving more Internet connectivity? Don’t miss the Portland Broadband Strategic Plan Kick-Off event, January 28—over broadband even, if you like

That’s why we all started drooling all over Google Fiber. And that’s why an awful lot of us are excited about Portland’s latest connectivity plan – citywide broadband.

Who doesn’t want a faster more reliable connection to the Internet? Well okay. I guess there are some people who don’t. But the majority of us? That speed and reliability sounds pretty good.

That’s why we all started drooling all over Google Fiber. And that’s why an awful lot of us are excited about the potential for Portland’s latest connectivity plan—citywide broadband. Read More

REMINDER: Take a few seconds to respond to the Portland software community census

Because there has been no measurement of that group. Until now. The Portland software community census is designed to take a stab at coming up with that magic number.

When I talk about the Portland software development and open source scenes, one of the first questions I always get—always—is “Sounds interesting. About how many people in Portland are involved in the software community there?”

And inevitably, as that question hangs in the air, I stare blankly. Smile feebly. And say, “A lot. There are a lot.” Because fact of the matter is: we have no idea. Maybe there are 50,000. Maybe there are 200. There’s no telling. Because there has been no measurement of that group. Until now. The Portland software community census is designed to take a stab at coming up with that magic number. Read More

Mayor Sam Adams and the City of Portland to open source, open data, and transparency communities: Let’s make this official

[HTML2]You may remember a couple of months back—during the Open Source Bridge conference—that Portland Mayor Sam Adams made a commitment to turn Portland into a “hub for open source.”

But conversing about a topic, as they say, is relatively easy. Or to put it more bluntly: talk is cheap.

That’s why it’s incredibly heartening to see the City moving to get something on the books with a resolution that is designed to officially make Portland a more open city. And if you care about open source—even remotely—it would be great to see you at the City Council meeting this Wednesday during the testimony and voting on the resolution. Read More

Salem launches a new meetup for the social techie types: SalemTribe

You know me. I’m a big fan of the techie type get togethers. Beer and Blog, Ignite Portland, camp camp campity camps, user groups. They’re all part of what make the Portland tech community, well, a community.

And so it’s always great to see other Oregon tech communities taking on similar communal kinds of things. Salem is doing just that. Introducing SalemTribe. Read More

Following the Florist: Consuming content and interacting with Silicon Florist readers

Well, how about reminding you about all the ways you can consume Silicon Florist content and interact with the awesome startup community here in the Silicon Forest?

It may be a short week, but it’s not a slow news week. That said, it is the Friday of a short week. And posting about really cool startups or important news may get lost in the haze of moving into the weekend.

What to do? What to do?

I’ve got it! How about taking care of some housekeeping around the ol’ Silicon Florist?

What kind of housekeeping you ask? Well, how about reminding you about all the ways you can consume Silicon Florist content and interact with the awesome startup community here in the Silicon Forest? Read More

Save CubeSpace: Rounding up the conversations while we wait for more details [Updated]

As last week drew to a close, the Portland tech community was rallying to help the de facto hub of our community, CubeSpace.

The fervent out-welling of emotion and support continued throughout the weekend—even resulting in coverage from traditional mainstream media.

While there isn’t a great to deal more to report at this point—and Eva and David are understandably choosing to remain silent until a decision has been made—I’ve been getting a number of emails, IMs, and tweets about the issue. So I thought I’d round up what I could. Read More

Save CubeSpace

Well, this is the last thing I expected on this Frenetic Friday. But it seems that arguably the de facto hub of the Portland startup tech scene, CubeSpace, is unfortunately in dire straits.

While we’re still not clear on the specifics dollar amounts involved in the situation, it is clear that the folks at CubeSpace are facing eviction. Read More

How would you describe the Portland open source, Web, and mobile startup scene? [Updated]

A number of us have recently had the opportunity to sit down with Amanda Hess. Amanda is working on a chapter for a larger piece on the Portland entrepreneurial scene, ranging from bikes to beer to restaurants to tech.

During the interviews, she’s been asking folks to describe the Portland tech scene in their own words. When she posed the question to me, I started to stutter through a fumbling response, when I suddenly realized I could do something better.

“Why don’t we ask the community?” I said. Read More

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