Category: Government

WHEREAS Portland loves open source: City of Portland declares Open Source in Government Week

City of Portland has done in recent history, they just declared this week “Open Source in Government” week in Portland to celebrate open source and the GOSCON —the government open source conference—being held here, this week

[HTML1]Let’s just get this out of the way: Portland, Oregon, is the de facto hub of open source.

There. I said it. What? Don’t believe me? Well, in addition to all of the other open source loving things the City of Portland has done in recent history, they just declared this week “Open Source in Government” week in Portland to celebrate open source and the GOSCON—the government open source conference—being held here, this week. Read More

TriMet: Extolling the virtues of open data in the Portland, Oregon, transit system

Here in Portland, we’re all about the open data. It’s all about sharing what’s available with the hopes that someone else may be able to do something useful with it, transforming it from pure data into useful information.

One of the earliest proponents of sharing data here in town was TriMet, our public transit system. And now Good has given us the opportunity to hear from some of the people who champion that open data mindset, every day. Read More

Got a burning idea on how to fix government with open source? You’ve got five minutes. Go.

When it comes to the government, everyone’s a critic. Full of stories with ways to do away with bureaucracy, streamline process, and save money. It’s just so obvious.

But would you be willing to get up in front of a crowd and share those ideas? How about cramming them into five minutes? Well, now here’s your chance as the popular Ignite format takes on the government with Ignite Government at GOSCON 2010. Read More

Cyborg Sunday: Hacking open government data following CyborgCamp Portland 2010

[HTML2]Today, any self respecting cyborg is either in attendance at CyborgCamp 2010 in Portland or wet wired into the CyborgCamp livestream.

But that’s today. Tomorrow? The CyborgCamp folks—and anyone else who is interested—are going to be rolling up their sleeves and getting down to business as part of the Open Government Hackathon at NedSpace Old Town. Read More

On open source and government: An accidental manifesto

[HTML1]A number of us recently read the Willamette Week’s coverage of open source and the City of Portland’s engagement with the open source community. Seeing this type of coverage from a mainstream publication was a high watermark of sorts. A step forward. But how big of a step?

I asked Audrey Eschright, Open Source Bridge co-founder, the driving force behind Calagator, and local open source advocate, for her take on it—for more details on her position, more insight into her thinking. What she provided wound up being—by her own admission—an accidental manifesto on open source and municipal government. Read More

Portland, open data, and CivicApps: 101 open datasets for your geeking pleasure

Enter CivicApps. A contest sponsored by the City of Portland designed to help stimulate and motivate the development community to mix and match all the awesome datasets

Remember back when the City of Portland opened up its data to developers? Sure you do. But you know what? All the accessible data in the world isn’t of much use unless someone is doing something with it. And that’s why the City is interested in getting people to come up with ideas for using the data—to improve the city and our way of life.

Enter CivicApps. A contest sponsored by the City of Portland designed to help stimulate and motivate the development community to mix and match all the awesome datasets—more than 100 different types—available from the City. Read More

Mayor Sam Adams and the City of Portland to open source, open data, and transparency communities: Let’s make this official

[HTML2]You may remember a couple of months back—during the Open Source Bridge conference—that Portland Mayor Sam Adams made a commitment to turn Portland into a “hub for open source.”

But conversing about a topic, as they say, is relatively easy. Or to put it more bluntly: talk is cheap.

That’s why it’s incredibly heartening to see the City moving to get something on the books with a resolution that is designed to officially make Portland a more open city. And if you care about open source—even remotely—it would be great to see you at the City Council meeting this Wednesday during the testimony and voting on the resolution. Read More

Open Source for America: OSU Open Source Lab’s Deb Bryant named to steering committee

How much of a hub is it? Well so much so that Deb Bryant Public Sector Communities Manager at the OSU OSL has just been named to the Open Source for America steering committee.

While I like to wax on about Portland being the de facto hub of open source, truth of the matter is that—just to the south of us—there’s a literal hub for open source: the Oregon State University Open Source Lab.

How much of a hub is it? Well so much so that Deb Bryant, Public Sector Communities Manager at the OSU OSL, has just been named to the Open Source for America steering committee. Read More

Portland Economic Development Strategy passes, City formally recognizes open source, mobile, coworking, and startup communities

Aside from being the first publicly recognized Portland economic development strategy in 15 years, it’s the first time that Portland has formally recognized the open source, mobile, coworking, and startup community.

[HTML2]While the news coming out of yesterday’s Portland City Council meeting will likely be mired in heated he-said she-said debates about the fate of the 39th Avenue / Cesar Chavez hoopla, something very important happened late in the day: Portland’s City Council unanimously passed the Portland Economic Development Strategy.

Why is this so momentous? Well, aside from being the first publicly recognized economic strategy for Portland in 15 years, it’s the first time that Portland has formally recognized the open source, mobile, coworking, and startup community. And that’s a big step forward. As Eva Schweber says, we should be proud. Read More

Meeting at City Hall: Open Source, Mobile, Startups and the Portland Economic Development Strategy

open source folks, mobile developers, Web types, tech-heavy micro businesses, coworking spaces, and individual developers was more than a lot of political glad handing. It was all part of preparing the Portland Economic Development Strategy.

[HTML3]Remember when Portland Mayor Sam Adams met with a bunch of startup types a few months back? Remember when he claimed that he wanted Portland to be one of the most open cities in the world?

Well, all of those meetings with open source folks, mobile developers, Web types, tech-heavy micro businesses, coworking spaces, and individual developers was more than a lot of political glad handing. It was all part of preparing the Portland Economic Development Strategy—a joint effort between the City and the Portland Development Commission and the first effort of its kind since 1994.

And now, we’ve got a chance to see if that strategy will become a reality. Read More

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