Category: Panic

What are the potential ramifications of having your source code stolen?

If I’ve said it once, I’ve said it a million times: Panic is one of the most amazing software companies Portland has ever created. But even amazing companies have their share of bad luck. Like recently, when Panic discovered that someone had managed to maliciously steal a good chunk of their source code.

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Help Panic help Japan: 100% of proceeds from today’s Panic sales go to earthquake victims

Of all the respected and well known software development shops here in town, one of the most loved by Apple types has to be Panic, makers of fine software like Transmit and Coda. And while they’re relatively quiet, they do know when to be loud.

This is one of those times.

In an effort to help disaster relief in Japan, Panic will be donating 100% of today’s sales to Mercy Corps and the Japanese Red Cross Society. Read More

Internet Garage Sale: The trust of Twitter, the auctions of eBay, the design of Craigslist

Creeped out by Craigslist? Tired of haggling with faceless trolls on eBay? Looking for somewhere where you can unload your crap valuable stuff to your friends or your friends’ friends? Then Internet Garage Sale, the latest project from Steven Frank—cofounder of Portland-based Panic—may be for you. If you can get an invite.

Creeped out by Craigslist? Tired of haggling with faceless trolls on eBay? Looking for somewhere where you can unload your crap valuable stuff to your friends or your friends’ friends?

Then Internet Garage Sale, the latest project from Steven Frank—cofounder of Portland-based Panic—may be for you. If you can get an invite. Read More

Panic releases tasty new version of Candybar

Portland-based Panic, makers of beautiful and highly functional Mac applications, has released a new version of its popular Candybar icon management tool. The new version is designed to work with the latest release of Mac OS X, Leopard–including the ability to customize the new Leopard dock.

New features include new interface, integrated Pixadex, large (512 x 512) icon support, Leopard dock customization, additional system icons, Quick Look integration, more reliable system icon restoration, and of course the inevitable “much more.”

For more information, visit Panic.

(Hat tip to Josh Pyles)

Panic starts Google Group for Coda, Web dev

Portland-based Panic, makers of some of the prettiest and most usable Apple Macintosh software anywhere, has announced the formation of a new discussion group, designed to facilitate communications among Coda users and Web developers in general. The discussion group is hosted on Google Groups.

Back in the Audion days, we had a very active (and useful!) mailing list, and it seemed only natural to re-create such a thing for Coda. It’s a complex and powerful program, and in talking to users, I frequently see a lot of its capabilities get overlooked, just because it’s a big piece of machinery.

Both Coda itself and general web development topics are fair-game for the mailing list. We hope the list will be a boon to both you the Coda user / web designer, and us the developer.

In related news, Panic also announced the release of Coda 1.04.

This release concentrates mainly on the remaining 1.0 bugs, and some important Leopard compatibility issues. That means, I’m sorry to say, no Subversion or Global Find-and-Replace yet. Now that most of the more significant bugs are dead, we’ll once again be shifting our focus to features, so hang in there!

For more information on Panic and its products, see the Panic site.

Coda named one of the 35 absolutely essential Mac apps

Portland-based Panic is well-known for developing beautiful and intuitive Apple Macintosh applications. So, it comes as no surprise that their latest product, Coda, follows suit.

What has been a nice surprise is the rave reviews the product has been receiving around the industry.

The latest? Freelance Switch has named Coda one of the 35 Absolutely Essential Mac Apps. To wit:

Coda is an all in one application that makes designers want to take notes and is a lot of web developer’s only tool. A text and css editor, a built in file browser (let’s not forget, these guys built Transmit) and an Apple Design Award to its honor. It also comes packed with a an actual web reference book reformatted and built into the actual application.

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