Category: Acquisition

Visualize an exit: Portland's Vizify acquired by Yahoo!

Another Portland startup has been acquired. Vizify has been picked by Yahoo! who has, obviously, been making a string of acquihires. Read More

Yet another perk: Perka acquired by First Data for an estimated $30 million or so

If you frequent Portland coffee shops—well honestly, like some 90 establishments coffee or otherwise in the Portland area—you’ve no doubt come across Perka, the service designed to replace the loyalty punch cards in your wallet with something far more manageable: an app. Read More

CONFIRMED: Portland's AppFog acquired by CenturyLink

Any number of outlets began reporting yesterday that Portland-based AppFog had been acquired by CenturyLink. Details were slim all around. But now CenturyLink has confirmed the news with a press release. Read More

Finding their way to Aruba: Portland startup Meridian acquired by Aruba Networks

Another Portland company has had a successful exit—and that also means another successful exit for the Oregon Angel Fund. Indoor mapping startup Meridian has been acquired by Aruba Networks. And it will remain in Portland as a wholly owned subsidiary. Read More

Portland startup Lucky Sort acquired by Twitter

Portland startup Lucky Sort, which has been focused on analyzing trends and patterns in written content in an attempt to predict market fluctuations, has been acquired by Twitter. Read More

FreeRange acquired by Kansas City’s Handmark

FreeRangePortland-based FreeRange—one of the leaders of the Portland mobile scene with customers like the Blazers, paidContent, and The Wall Street Journal—has been acquired by Handmark, a mobile entertainment company headquartered in Kansas City, MO.

Last year, I wrote:

If any company is the “founding father” of the burgeoning Portland mobile scene, FreeRange is it. With customers like the Wall Street Journal and the Portland Trail Blazers—and one of the most impressive mobile feed readers on the market—FreeRange is sure to keep Portland associated with mobile apps for a long time to come.

Oopie. Allow me to rephrase that. “Handmark is sure to keep Portland….”

According to the release, FreeRange is a “strategic addition” for Handmark, which has been recognized for its “mobile development expertise and management of a variety of desktop and on-device mobile stores full of the industry’s best games, applications and ringtones.”

“This is an exciting turning point for our company and we are proud to become part of the Handmark organization,” said Jon Maroney, FreeRange CEO. “Handmark has built a large network of happy customers across a wide range of mobile devices. This offers a great opportunity for FreeRange partners to expand their reach, adding tremendous value to content delivered via our publishing platform.”

Financial terms of the deal were not disclosed.

For more information on the acquisition, see the FreeRange blog.

(Hat tip Jason Grigsby)

Strands improves its net worth with NetworthIQ acquisition (Now it can be told)

Sometimes, you just have to wait to share the good news. And, Corvallis-based Strands acquiring Portland-based NetworthIQ is just one of those such deals.

Ryan Williams, the guy who has worked to make the NetworthIQ service one of the more popular personal finance management services on the Web, finally announced the news this morning, bringing to fruition the news at which he hinted long, long ago. (Looks like Ryan’s old Twitter account has been deleted, but here are a couple of my and Jason Harris’ replies to some of Ryan’s cryptic hints.)

So, now the news is out. And it’s great news for a couple of Silicon Forest startups.

News, in fact, that a number of outlets have already beat me to covering—The Oregonian, the Portland Business Journal, GigaOm… oh a little blog you may have heard of called TechCrunch, which had this to say:

Just over two weeks ago Strands acquired Expensr, and now the company is announcing its acquisition of NetworthIQ. Both are personal finance applications that Strands wanted mostly for their human capital, but also for some of their technology assets. The terms of both deals were not disclosed.

Ryan provided some insight in his post entitled “Breaking the silence“:

It was just over 3 years ago that we started working on NetworthIQ. It was a bit of a bumpy ride. In the first couple months, I wasn’t sure if it was going to make it, but with a couple of high-profile press mentions we were off and running. The idea for NetworthIQ was pretty basic, apply the popular Web 2.0 principles of the time (social networking, public sharing, collective intelligence) and apply it to personal finance, something that hadn’t been done before. There was the occasional “this is the dumbest site ever” comment, but for the most part we always got great response and feedback from those that signed up, which was what kept me going.

But, as usual, I just wasn’t satisfied. So I asked Ryan if he could give me some more insight on how the deal went down and what it meant for the future. And Ryan was kind enough to share some additional thoughts on this momentous occasion.

Surprisingly, the news that took so long to make it to the public, actually came about pretty quickly.

“It’s funny, in the weeks before I was contacted by Strands, I had been scanning their jobs after the latest funding round,” said Williams. “Just to see, you know? Nothing serious. But, then I heard from them and the talks progressed pretty quickly.”

A music recommendation service and a personal finance management service would have seemed like strange bedfellows at the time. But that was because none of us knew about moneyStrands until just recently.

But Strands and Williams knew.

“It was easy to see there was a good fit with what we were doing on NetworthIQ and where Strands was going with the moneyStrands project,” he said. “In a matter of a couple weeks I was ready to come onboard.”

A Cinderella story? A side project turned full time? Absolutely.

“Since starting NetworthIQ, I was working towards being able to work on a startup full-time, but as a relatively older web entrepreneur, there were more things to worry about. I hadn’t yet reached the point of being able to drop the day job,” said Williams. “This was a chance to make that happen, and with the talented and driven Strands team, it made the decision easy.”

But, even at this moment of victory, the humble Williams downplays the whole thing.

“I know for many, it’s not the most exciting technology to be working on—personal finance tools—but I’m really drawn to building things that are useful to me personally,” he said. “And personal finance tools are what I spend a good amount of time in. Plus with the way things are going with the economy and our increasing dependence on consumer debt, I think it’s a very important area to innovate in.”

So what does the future hold for Strands and its new technology? And where is that innovation going to take place?

Unfortunately, that’s another secret for which we’ll have to wait.

Platial acquires Frappr (updated)

Portland-based Platial, the social mapping community with all of its vowels still intact, has acquired competitor Frappr.

Platial welcomes Frappr users

Details are fairly limited at this time. Aside from a welcome message to Frappr users on the Platial site.

Platial has dropped a press release to announce the acquisition (hat tip to paidContent), purporting to be the “#1 Social Map site.”

Platials CEO Di-Ann Eisnor says, We are delighted to have the Frappr community join the Platial family. This reinforces our vision to connect people, neighborhoods and nations around the world. Together, we will make social mapping more accessible, more valuable and a more fundamental part of Web 2.0, encompassing mobile and local search. We will also introduce new, more effective advertising models using social data and location to create greater relevance.

So what about that other company that does something with maps? You know, that one down in Mountain View and in The Dalles? Marshall Kirkpatrick of Read/Write Web provides guidance on what this acquisition actually means.

At the time of this posting, this has not been announced on the Platial blog. [Update] On October 23, Platial posted a blog entry about the benefits of the acquired technology.

More information as it becomes available.

See additional coverage in TechCrunch, Mashable, paidContent, and Read/Write Web.

Version Tracker acquired by CNET

Portland-based Version Tracker, which began its life a decade ago as Kurt Christensen’s list for tracking the latest Macintosh software, announced that the company has been acquired by CNET.

Kurt shares the news on the Version Tracker blog:

Today marks an important milestone for us, as we become part of the CNET family of sites. I’m really excited about this. It gives VersionTracker—and our sister sites, iPhone Atlas and MacFixIt—more resources to grow and gives us higher visibility than I could have ever imagined for our humble site. It also gives CNET a stronger presence in the Mac market than ever before. I think that says a lot about what we’ve been able to create here at TechTracker.

Response from the Version Tracker community has been mixed. Several comments express little love for CNET entering the picture.

(Hat tip Nino Marchetti)

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