Category: NetworthIQ

moneyStrands: Strands gets Mint-y and then some

moneyStrandsCorvallis-based Strands has received a great deal of attention—well, from Silicon Florist and Louis Gray, at least—for its lifestreaming product, Strands.

Yet all the while, the moneyStrands team was busily slaving away. Building cool features. Running private betas. Working to build a tool for helping people better manage their finances.

Well now, all of that hard work has paid off: moneyStrands is now open for business.

moneyStrands

What does moneyStrands do?

After a very informative private beta phase we are happy to have finally taken the critical step of opening up our registration to new users. This officially kicks off a new and exciting phase of our journey to help people better manage their financial lives.

I’ve just started mucking with moneyStrands, but at the outset, it strikes me as very much like Mint, the popular personal finance tool. Still, it has something more: Strands recommender technology.

moneyStrands’ intelligent recommendation engine searches expert tips, relevant facts, and product offers from many sources to nd the best deals and advice that match your financial profile. As your life changes, your financial goals also change. moneyStrands learns, anticipates and adapts to your needs and priorities along the way.

Plus—thanks no doubt to their NetworthIQ acquistion—you can share and compare details with others:

Find and connect with like-minded members who share your goals and your traits. See how you compare, share your thoughts on best bargains or just exchange financial tips and money missteps. Your experience is as valuable as any others and there is no better insider track than following to the word of mouth.

For more details on all the ways moneyStrands can help you with your personal finances, download the moneyStrands poster. To take it for a spin, visit moneyStrands (if you’re a Strands user, you can use the same login.)

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Strands improves its net worth with NetworthIQ acquisition (Now it can be told)

Sometimes, you just have to wait to share the good news. And, Corvallis-based Strands acquiring Portland-based NetworthIQ is just one of those such deals.

Ryan Williams, the guy who has worked to make the NetworthIQ service one of the more popular personal finance management services on the Web, finally announced the news this morning, bringing to fruition the news at which he hinted long, long ago. (Looks like Ryan’s old Twitter account has been deleted, but here are a couple of my and Jason Harris’ replies to some of Ryan’s cryptic hints.)

So, now the news is out. And it’s great news for a couple of Silicon Forest startups.

News, in fact, that a number of outlets have already beat me to covering—The Oregonian, the Portland Business Journal, GigaOm… oh a little blog you may have heard of called TechCrunch, which had this to say:

Just over two weeks ago Strands acquired Expensr, and now the company is announcing its acquisition of NetworthIQ. Both are personal finance applications that Strands wanted mostly for their human capital, but also for some of their technology assets. The terms of both deals were not disclosed.

Ryan provided some insight in his post entitled “Breaking the silence“:

It was just over 3 years ago that we started working on NetworthIQ. It was a bit of a bumpy ride. In the first couple months, I wasn’t sure if it was going to make it, but with a couple of high-profile press mentions we were off and running. The idea for NetworthIQ was pretty basic, apply the popular Web 2.0 principles of the time (social networking, public sharing, collective intelligence) and apply it to personal finance, something that hadn’t been done before. There was the occasional “this is the dumbest site ever” comment, but for the most part we always got great response and feedback from those that signed up, which was what kept me going.

But, as usual, I just wasn’t satisfied. So I asked Ryan if he could give me some more insight on how the deal went down and what it meant for the future. And Ryan was kind enough to share some additional thoughts on this momentous occasion.

Surprisingly, the news that took so long to make it to the public, actually came about pretty quickly.

“It’s funny, in the weeks before I was contacted by Strands, I had been scanning their jobs after the latest funding round,” said Williams. “Just to see, you know? Nothing serious. But, then I heard from them and the talks progressed pretty quickly.”

A music recommendation service and a personal finance management service would have seemed like strange bedfellows at the time. But that was because none of us knew about moneyStrands until just recently.

But Strands and Williams knew.

“It was easy to see there was a good fit with what we were doing on NetworthIQ and where Strands was going with the moneyStrands project,” he said. “In a matter of a couple weeks I was ready to come onboard.”

A Cinderella story? A side project turned full time? Absolutely.

“Since starting NetworthIQ, I was working towards being able to work on a startup full-time, but as a relatively older web entrepreneur, there were more things to worry about. I hadn’t yet reached the point of being able to drop the day job,” said Williams. “This was a chance to make that happen, and with the talented and driven Strands team, it made the decision easy.”

But, even at this moment of victory, the humble Williams downplays the whole thing.

“I know for many, it’s not the most exciting technology to be working on—personal finance tools—but I’m really drawn to building things that are useful to me personally,” he said. “And personal finance tools are what I spend a good amount of time in. Plus with the way things are going with the economy and our increasing dependence on consumer debt, I think it’s a very important area to innovate in.”

So what does the future hold for Strands and its new technology? And where is that innovation going to take place?

Unfortunately, that’s another secret for which we’ll have to wait.

NetworthIQ sees users surge after Aussie ink

Portland-based NetworthIQ, the site that helps individuals track—and promote–their financial net worth, is reporting a surge in users after receiving favorable coverage in news.com.au.

Via the newswire that is Twitter, I’m hearing numbers north of 200, but shy of the one-day record of 391 set by the New York Times.

Inspired by the personal finance bloggers who feel liberated enough to share their net worth with the world, and other social sites (Flickr, 43things, del.icio.us, upcoming.org), NetworthIQ was conceived as a place where people can track, share and compare their financial status. The company describes it as a “social personal finance tool.”

To-do: Name that stealthy Portland startup

It’s Friday. Isn’t it? It is right? I’ve kinda lost track of time.

What’s that? It is? Okay, great. In Portland, too? Okay, cool.

Ahem.

It’s Friday, so why not give yourself a little treat?

Ryan Williams of NetworthIQ fame has a new project in the works. It’s stealth. Super stealth.

Well, that’s what I’m claiming, anyway. Because the project doesn’t have a name. And in my book, you can’t be much more stealth than that.

Worse yet? He doesn’t quite know what to call it.

So you get to help.

Which is the best domain name for a site that aggregates feeds from traditional and social sites for a city?

  • socialmetro.com
  • metbuzz.com
  • vibelocal.com
  • localsignal.com

Exercise your inner-entrepreneur—or your outer one for that matter—by swinging by Ryan’s blog, Web things considered, and placing your vote. Or suggesting a new name.

[Update] Ryan was nice enough to drop by a provide a link to the work-in-progress. Might provide a little more inspiration for your vote.

Web Worker Daily covers NetworthIQ

Portland-based Fourio‘s NetworthIQ was listed in a recent article in Web Worker Daily on social money management tools.

Get a read on your net worth. NetworthIQ allows you to track the changes in your net worth and look at how other people’s net worth is changing too. You can check by various attributes like geographic location, education, and so forth in order to see how you’re doing relative to your peers.

Apparently, NetworthIQ has also garnered recent coverage in the Boston Globe and the Wall Street Journal. But I mean really. Who reads those pubs, anyway?

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