Category: News

Coda named one of the 35 absolutely essential Mac apps

Portland-based Panic is well-known for developing beautiful and intuitive Apple Macintosh applications. So, it comes as no surprise that their latest product, Coda, follows suit.

What has been a nice surprise is the rave reviews the product has been receiving around the industry.

The latest? Freelance Switch has named Coda one of the 35 Absolutely Essential Mac Apps. To wit:

Coda is an all in one application that makes designers want to take notes and is a lot of web developer’s only tool. A text and css editor, a built in file browser (let’s not forget, these guys built Transmit) and an Apple Design Award to its honor. It also comes packed with a an actual web reference book reformatted and built into the actual application.

Goboz launches Digg for Portland

Portland-based Goboz, which has been available to a closed group of beta testers, has officially gone live, today, as promised.

Goboz features Citysearch-like functionality for reviewing and rating business. And the company has been working to position itself in this light. I mean, it’s Portland. We like to chat about our restaurants and bars. And, continuing down that path will likely be Goboz’ best means of supporting the site with local advertising revenue.

And, it’s true: Citysearch is horrible. It’s an easy target. No argument there.

At first blush, the easy Goboz brush-off could be “Another Digg clone?” or “Is this another Pligg site?” Do we really need another way to rank restaurants and bars in town?

Maybe not. But Goboz has something we do need. I’m thinking there’s some real potential here. That, if Goboz plays their cards right, they could fill a very interesting niche for the Portland Web community.

I think the true utility of Goboz is its ranking engine. Not for businesses, necessarily, but for Portland-based news and blog entries. And currently, that sort of activity is vastly under-served in our beloved Rose City.

I mean, as far as locally focused news-ranking services go, there’s The Oregonian reddit. And then there’s…. Well, that’s about it, actually.

So, while Goboz seems to want to lump themselves in with the Citysearch crowd, I’m going to advise you head over to the Goboz site with “Portland’s Digg” in mind. There could be some real value to the blogging community in that type of service.

In fact, I’ve added this post to Goboz, and we’ll see if you agree.

Breaking News: SplashCast to release fullscreen player

We all know that Portland-based SplashCast has been hinting at some interesting stuff in the works. It appears that one of the features in the offing is a fullscreen version of the SplashCast player.

Well, It’s big. I’m not seeing any content Now, I’m seeing content.

I’ve no idea how long this link will be live. But give the SplashCast fullscreen player a shot.

[Update] In other news, it appears that SplashCast has revamped their landing page, giving visitors direct access to SplashCast channels. Another welcome change.

Oregon Startups finds 37, asks for more

[Editor: Ah good. The long weekend is over. Now, we can get back to the news. I’ve been holding this one for you, waiting for you to get back to your computer. Because that’s just how I am, gentle reader.]

There’s a great list of Oregon-based Web 2.0 companies posted on Oregon Startups. It’s currently sitting at 37 companies:

Expanding the focus to Oregon (not just Portland) I’ve been putting together a list of Oregon Web 2.0, building on the inputs from Michael and Ryan. And I’m up to 37. You can certainly argue that some of these are “Web 2.0 technology companies” as opposed to “Web 2.0 companies” (e.g., JanRain with their Open ID technology) — so yes, I’m being flexible. I will argue that all of these companies have a very strong plug-in to web 2.0!

Is your startup there? Is your friends’ startup there? Check the list and do your part to help it grow.

AboutUs expands into new space

AboutUs, the Portland-based Wikipedia of business listings, has relocated its office, moving to a larger space in industrial Southeast Portland. The Olympic Mill, to be exact. Or the OMCC, as the cool kids like to say.

Need to drop by? Here’s the address:

For anyone needing to send us mail, cookies or other care packages at the new space, the address is: 107 SE Washington #520, Portland, OR 97214

AboutUs is a wiki whose goal is to create a free and valuable Internet resource containing information both about websites and other community created topics. The site was pre-populated with information about many different websites and thousands of updates are now being made by people each day.

Jive Software secures $15 million… and moves blog to Clearspace

Big news coming out of Jive Software today. The company announced that it has secured a $15 million round of funding led by Sequoia Capital.

From VentureBeat

One with considerable momentum is Jive Software, a Portland, Ore. Its product, Clearspace, doesn’t tack various software programs together. It offers it all from ground-up: It lets employees and customers collaborate on a mix of blogs, wikis, forums, chat, tagging, files and reputation systems into a single interface behind the corporate firewall (or outside it, if customers are involved, in which case it governs a publishing system that controls what gets outside the firewall). The company was bootstrapped for years, but in February, hit a vein, says chief executive Dave Hersh — demand for its product became overwhelming.

Jive will do more than $15 million in sales this year, with the second quarter revenue almost double what it was the same quarter of last year. It has more than 2,000 customers, says Hersh, mentioning names like IBM, Sun and BEA. So it has taken $15 million from Silicon Valley venture firm Sequoia Capital, to handle the growth.

Mike Rogoway of The Oregonian also covered this round:

Jive said it plans to use the money to continue developing its software and to market its products. Jive is the latest company to benefit from a surge in venture capital backing Oregon businesses. Venture capitalists invested $173 million in Oregon companies during the first six months of the year, up from $76 million in the first half last year.

Mashable covered the funding, as well.

Still no post on the Jive blog or in the Jive newsroom, so I’ll provide other details as they become available.

[UPDATE] As of Monday morning, still nothing from the horse’s mouth, but Om Malik is reporting that the funding will be used to “push sales and marketing of its Clearspace line-up of products,” while Portland station KGW has pulled an AP story that states, “The company said it will be scaling up operations, development and setting up international offices as a result of the investment.”

In related news, when I headed over to the Jive blog to see if they had posted anything, I was happy to see that they had ported their blog to their own Clearspace product. “Eating their own dogfood” as it were.

Although, Clearspace appears to be mighty tasty dogfood.

RailsBoxcar open for business

Unveiled earlier this year, RailsBoxcar is now open for business.

Portland-based Planet Argon has announced that the pricing for their Ruby on Rails hosting environment has been released and that they are prepared to take orders.

Good news if you’re a Portland Rails developer looking for local hosting for your app.

[Boxcar is] a new hosting service, which aims to provide you with even more privacy, more guaranteed resources, and better options for scaling your Rails application as your business grows.

For more information, see the Planet Argon blog.

PLANET ARGON is a Ruby on Rails development, consulting, and hosting company that encompasses a network of developers and administrators that love working with open source technology. Founded in 2002, PLANET ARGON started only as a custom web application development company, but eventually expanded its services to offer web and database hosting to the general public, specifically to fellow developers.

Ignite Portland begins to smolder

As mentioned earlier (“Ignite Portland?“), Josh Bancroft came back from Gnomedex with an urge to begin Ignite Portland.

Well, if Twitter is any indication, a small planning session, today, seems to have been extremely positive. Josh mentions it in tweets here and here. And Dawn Foster mentioned it in a tweet as well, offering that something may be happening as soon as October. I know that Raven Zachary was in attendance, too.

Both Raven and Dawn are involved in organizing the annual BarCamp Portland and monthly BarCamp Portland Meetup events.

(Full disclosure: I was honored to be invited to attend this planning session, but had to decline due to personal commitments.)

More details on Ignite Portland as they become available.

[Update] Ignite Portland has a Facebook Group, now.

Web Worker Daily covers NetworthIQ

Portland-based Fourio‘s NetworthIQ was listed in a recent article in Web Worker Daily on social money management tools.

Get a read on your net worth. NetworthIQ allows you to track the changes in your net worth and look at how other people’s net worth is changing too. You can check by various attributes like geographic location, education, and so forth in order to see how you’re doing relative to your peers.

Apparently, NetworthIQ has also garnered recent coverage in the Boston Globe and the Wall Street Journal. But I mean really. Who reads those pubs, anyway?

Matt Beck named to Shopify Advisory Council

Recent changes in the Shopify pricing structure have had unfortunate effects on a number Portland-area developers. And some of them, like Matt Beck of CouldBe Studios, are letting the Shopify team hear about it.

Beck voiced his displeasure on the What Could Be blog, highlighting the problems with the way that Ottawa-based JadedPixel, makers of Shopify, handled the pricing change.

The problem we had with the situation was not the new rates which are actually quite reasonable, but that the change was carried out in secrecy, which left us in a potentially sticky spot as we had bids out to potential clients which were based on their old pricing model, and even worse projects currently being developed that had their pricing model changed! How were we supposed to handle that? We’d quoted people based on their old pricing model, started working on the site and then had it change mid-way through.

No good deed goes unpunished. So, with his thoughtful comments, Beck has been rewarded with a position on the newly formed Shopify Advisory Council.

The Council is made up of a handful of Shopify users who are particularly passionate and active in the forums, and we will be bouncing ideas off of them concerning both how we communicate changes to our users and specific strategies for improving Shopify in general. This means that the Shopify team will be able to get user feedback on things before they are quite ready to be announced publicly, and we’ll then be able to balance our priorities and adjust our efforts accordingly.

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