Tag: matt king

Cozying up: Instrument and Urban Airship alum Matt King joins Cozy as they open a Portland office

It’s a good time to be in Portland. And while our homegrown startups are knocking it out of the park, we’re attracting startups from elsewhere, too. Take Cozy, a Bay Area startup that just hired Portland-native Matt King—an alum high-powered local shops like Instrument and Urban Airship—and opened up a Portland office. Read More

Raise your glass to more acquisitions! Portland’s Unthirsty gets acquired

You may have heard that 2010 is the year of acquisitions in Portland. Turns out Portland-based Unthirsty – a side project for Jason Glaspey and Matt King – just sold for an undisclosed sum.

Well well well. You may have heard that 2010 is the year of acquisitions in Portland. No really. It is. Don’t believe me? Well, I’ve got another one for you. That’s right. Already.

Turns out Portland-based Unthirsty—a side project for Jason Glaspey and Matt King—just sold for an undisclosed sum. Read More

TwitterLocal: It’s back… and now it’s all AIR all the time

Remember TwitterLocal ne TwitterWhere? That great site that allowed you to access a stream of tweets based on where people lived? And that provided a list of the 30 most Twitter-savvy cities?

Well, when Twitter changed their API rules to survive the summer of FAIL whale, it crippled the service. And, as such, we’ve been scrapping and scraping to find resources that allow us to find local folks.

TwitterLocal is back—as an Adobe AIR application. Feel free to download the brand spanking new version and get to searching.

TwitterLocal

Never let anyone say that Matt King won’t find a better way.

Since Twitter cut off their Jabber feed from TwitterLocal, we had to rely purely on the XML API, which meant that only about 20% of Tweets from the public timeline got into TwitterLocal. Now that Twitter has a location-based search API, we don’t have to cache the posts anymore. So now, TwitterLocal is going to be purely an Adobe AIR based application that allows you to filter Tweets by location.

With the new Air app, TwitterLocal supports regional searches with various radii. And it supports multiple tabs—so that you can watch a number of different regions at the same time.

TwitterLocal Tabs

Plus, the beauty of AIR is that it’s crossplatform, right out of the box.

So nice to have this tool back. Now, if we could only get Matt back from his Great Britain junket—our own local version of “Where the Hell is Matt?

TwitterLocal Leader Board adds Top Twitterers by region

With TwitterLocal, Portland’s Matt King took a interesting foray into tracking Twitter users based on their geographical location.

But was that enough for Matt? Oh no.

So, he had to go and make it even more compelling by adding a “Leader Board,” that listed the top 30 Twitter cities, based on the number of tweets per capita.

Brilliant!

Still not enough for Matt.

But now he really may have gone too far. Because he just snuck in what could amount to one of the most compelling slicing-and-dicings of the Twitter types I’ve seen.

That’s right folks. The Twitter leader rankings heretofore relegated to the global stage of Tweeterboard have now—thanks to Matt—taken on a decidedly local flavor.

The TwitterLocal Leader Board now provides the leading Twitter users for each city. (Here’s a snapshot of Portland’s leading Twitter users over the last 24 hours, for example.)

As an added bonus, this new view into Twitter locales also provides a flowing tweet stream from local residents.

Our little TwitterLocal is now a big ol’ “Pulse of [your leading Twitter city here],” with insight into who is currently contributing the most to the conversation.

Tweet globally, rank locally.

For more, take a moment to review the TwitterLocal Leader Board and click through to some of the leading locales.

Six map apps that put Portland on the mapping map

Maybe it’s the fact that we’re a major inland port. Maybe it’s the affection for the outdoors that permeates the Portland culture. Whatever it is, we’ve got something for maps around here. Portland is map happy. And nowhere is that more evident than our obsession with the mapping APIs that further the technology of cartography.

Don’t believe me? Take a look at the mapping and location apps that call Portland, Oregon, home. (Thanks in no small part to the reigning King of mapping, Matt King. An “*” below identifies each of his mapping projects.)

Platial

The most well-known Portland-based mapping application, Platial, is the largest independent social mapping application. According to the Platial site:

Platial enables anyone to find, create, and use meaningful maps of Places that matter to them. Our dream is to connect people, neighborhoods, cities, and countries through a citizen-driven common context that goes beyond geopolitical boundaries. We are building Platial because we adore Places.

Unthirsty*

The admittedly “we did it for the fun of it project” that helps the would-be lush-on-a-budget find the nearest happy hour. And fast.

In Unthirsty‘s own words:

Unthirsty is the work of a group of like-minded souls who were always struggling (for obvious reasons) to remember where and when they last enjoyed that good happy hour. A plan of action was drawn up on beer sodden napkins over bargain pints and some mighty fine nachos. Thus, Unthirsty was launched and dedicated to the good of all mankind’s legally drinking denizens.

KnitMap*

Yearning for yarn? Look no further than KnitMap, your way to finding all of your needling knitting needs or simply getting your Turkish Cast-on on.

KnitMap describes itself as:

[A] site that catalogues and maps the locations of retail shops that sell yarn, knitting supplies and knitting accessories. You can search to find these locations in the US, Canada, UK and most of Europe. Its anywhere that Google maps will work, and the list is growing everyday! Once you’ve found a shop, you can rate it’s attributes, leave comments, upload photos, and add it to your Favorites.

SocialMap*

Think Unthirsty and KnitMap are cool, but interested in putting your own spin on the “plot and find [whatever] via Google Maps”? Then look no further than SocialMap, the mapping technology that powers both of those properties.

Why release SocialMap?

SocialMap was created to help solve the problems we encountered on the web within the communities we are a part of. Through its humble beginnings as a national Happy Hour finder, then a Knitting store locator, we noticed regions and groups that had a passionate user base, but were very underrepresented online. Existing websites and search engines were not only dated in their technology but lacked the ability for users to interact with the information presented.

Mapdango

Winner of the “Best Mashup” at this year’s Mashup Camp, Mapdango takes other API-accessible content and plots it on the map.

Mashup Awards described Mapdango as:

An extensive Google Maps mashup that lets you explore locations with helpful information including weather (WeatherBug), photos (Flickr), facts (Wikipedia), events (Eventful), news (Google News) and more.

WeoGeo

New to the Portland mapping scene, WeoGeo takes a deep dive into online cartography, providing extremely detailed mapping options.

[WeoGeo] supplies surveyors, engineers, cartographers, and scientists with the ability to conveniently store, search, and exchange high-resolution CAD and GIS mapping products. Mappers easily list their data for sale. Researchers quickly find the data they need.

(Bonus) TwitterLocal* (formerly known as TwitterWhere)

It’s not a mapping application, per se, so I didn’t want to include it on the list. But TwitterLocal is another Matt King project that makes location information useful in the context of Twitter. Simply plug in a location and TwitterLocal will provide an RSS feed of the Twitter residents in that area, like Portland, for example. It’s a valuable tool for getting a feel for your neighborhood Twitter types.

That’s just a short list. But, admittedly, there’s so much mapping occurring in map-happy Portland, that I may have missed some obvious maps. If I did, please feel free to admonish me in the comments.

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