Tag: Apple

memePDX 030: #pdxboom, Kickball, TechStars Seattle, Apple iPad, JooJoo, New iPhones, and Android Froyo

This week on memePDX, Cami Kaos and I discuss #pdxboom, Kickball for Foursquare, TechStars Seattle, Apple iPad’s pending release, and some new mobile handsets on the horizon.

Happy April Fool’s Day and happy Thursday! It’s time for another memePDX which has its own sort of foolishness—every week.

This week on memePDX, Cami Kaos and I discuss #pdxboom, Kickball for Foursquare, TechStars Seattle, Apple iPad’s pending release, and some new mobile handsets on the horizon. Read More

memePDX 022: All Apple iPad, all of the time

So rather than pretend we were paying attention to other stuff, we decided to just focus memePDX into an all Apple iPad episode.

Hey there, Portland tech types! It’s another Thursday, and that means it’s time for another episode of memePDX.

Now, I’m sure there was probably some other tech news that happened this week. But, let’s be honest. We were a little wrapped up in the whole Apple announcement thing. Obsessed some might call it. So rather than pretend we were paying attention to other stuff—except my cool Portland Sucks tshirt and tagalus hitting 10,000 definitions—we decided to just focus on the one thing that had so captured our imagination. So without further ado, let’s get to the all Apple iPad episode. Read More

memePDX 011: Venture Mash, Foodgeeks, Ignite Corvallis, Steph is back on The Square, Apple and DROID stuff

This week on memePDX, Cami Kaos and Rick Turoczy cover Venture Mash, Foodgeeks, Ignite Corvallis, Stephanie Stricklen is back at KGW The Square, Apple and DROID stuff.

I know, I know. We’re running a little late. We seriously didn’t mean to stand you up for lunch. Sometimes these things just happen. We’re really sorry.

But it’s still Thursday. And so we’re still kind of on time. Right? Right?

This week on memePDX, Cami Kaos and Rick Turoczy cover Venture Mash, Foodgeeks, Ignite Corvallis, Stephanie Stricklen is back at KGW The Square, Apple and DROID stuff. Read More

memePDX 009: Open Source Bridge, grilling gubernatorial candidates, Willamette Innovators Night, Jive, Windows 7, and Apple magic

This week, Cami Kaos and I discuss Doug Coleman’s interview with Gary Vaynerchuk, Open Source Bridge 2010, questioning Oregon’s gubernatorial candidates, Willamette Innovators Night, Jive securing $12 million more from Sequoia, Microsoft Windows 7, and new products from Apple.

Oh hi! It’s Thursday again already. And that means it’s time for you to sit through another episode of memePDX.

Not convinced it’s worth your time? I don’t blame you. But here’s what we covered in case one of these piques your interest. This week, Cami Kaos and I discuss Doug Coleman’s interview with Gary Vaynerchuk, Open Source Bridge 2010, questioning Oregon’s gubernatorial candidates, Willamette Innovators Night, Jive securing $12 million more from Sequoia, Microsoft Windows 7, and new products from Apple.

Oh sure. Now you’re interested. Read More

Zipcar iPhone app shifts into gear

A few months back during Apple’s Worldwide Developer Conference, the folks at Apple got up on stage to demonstrate a very cool little iPhone app for Zipcar.

The app—designed by Portland-based iPhone agency Small Society—allowed you to find and reserve Zipcars, unlock your car, even honk the horn. But for all the bells and whistles, the app had one major problem: it wasn’t available to the general public. Until now. Read More

memePDX 002: Mobile, Portland on Fire, Apple, and green screen goodness

Admittedly, we’re still getting the kinks worked out on memePDX, the new podcast featuring Cami Kaos and me that covers all the tech news that we can wedge into 20 minutes. This week, we introduce a whole new feature: tricaster green screen magic. So even if Cami and I are boring, Dr. Normal will find something with which to entertain you.

This week on memePDX we talk about PhoneGap, Urban Airship, Portland on Fire, Apple Snow Leopard, the rumored Apple Cougar OS, and the equally rumored Apple Tablet. And then we throw in a little Skype and Marvel + Disney for good measure. Read More

iPhone developers rejoice: Urban Airship launches push notification beta

Portland-based Urban Airship, the little company that’s going to help iPhone app developers scale in big ways, has announced that they are now accepting participants as part of their beta program for Apple Push Notification Services.

Portland-based Urban Airship, the little company that’s going to help iPhone app developers scale in big ways, has announced that they are now accepting participants as part of their beta program for Apple Push Notification Services.

If you’re a developer working on an iPhone app and you want to take advantage of iPhone OS 3.0 features, I’d highly suggest you check it out. Even if you’re not, the whole setup is pretty impressive. Read More

Tap tap: Urban Airship celebrates launch of iPhone OS 3.0 with Tapulous deal

Today as Apple makes iPhone OS 3.0 available, Urban Airship announces a deal with Tapulous makers of the insanely popular Tap Tap Revenge that will enable the game to support the latest iPhone 3.0 features.

Okay. I have to admit, I thought it was a big deal when Portland-based Urban Airship launched at WWDC and announced Portland-based Subatomic Studios as their first customer.

But just wait until you hear this.

Today as Apple makes iPhone OS 3.0 available, Urban Airship announces a deal with Tapulous—makers of the insanely popular Tap Tap Revenge—that will enable the game to support the latest iPhone 3.0 features. Read More

Urban Airship: Providing air cover for independent iPhone developers

Portland-based Urban Airship is taking flight at Apple’s Worldwide Developer Conference in hopes of providing similar support to independent Apple iPhone developers. And just like their Web app predecessors, the impact could be huge.

[HTML2]While everyone points to the prevalence of open source as the primary reason for the renaissance of the Web affectionately titled “Web 2.0,” there are two particular components of Web development that have played a critical, albeit under appreciated, role. Those unsung heros? Frameworks, a means of simplifying common development tasks that allows developers to focus on the apps they want to build rather than the stuff they have to build, and Web services, a means of extending functionality and infrastructure by using services in the cloud.

Those two things have empowered small independent development teams which, in turn, has created the Web we know today.

Now, Portland-based Urban Airship is taking flight at Apple’s Worldwide Developer Conference in hopes of providing similar support to independent Apple iPhone developers. And just like their Web app predecessors, the impact could be huge. Read More

What’s it like to submit an application to the iPhone App Store?

FastFiguresEver wondered what it’s like to submit an iPhone application to the Apple App Store? Now, Beaverton-based FastFigures provides some much needed insight into the whole process with the lessons they learned after one month in the iPhone App Store.

The post provides a fascinating look into the planning of the launch, including struggling with issues like pricing:

The price sensitivity data showed a starting price of $9.99 maximized revenue but I was concerned that these customers were too familiar with our products and wouldn’t represent the broader world of iPhone users. After agonizing over this for over a week, I decided to adjust the pricing based on some additional factors and settled on $5.99. This decision is proving to be both a good one and a bad one, and I struggle with selling our applications so inexpensively to this day.

Mistakes made:

And this is where not understanding the process hurt us. First, I didn’t realize that there was some additional paperwork that needed to be completed. That was completed on the 23rd. Then, once everything is signed off, it takes 24 hours to show up in the AppStore. Finally on the 24th, I’m looking for the application in What’s New and can’t find it!

And valuable lessons learned:
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Two things happened around March 19th that changed our fortunes. For one, we hit that magical 20 review level I’ve talked about before. Second, one of the products in the Finance category most similar to ours went free. There has been a lot of discussion on the web about free applications versus paid applications and that the two customers aren’t the same. And this competitive application proved that.

Plus, some insightful suggestions:

Can you make money in the AppStore? Yes. But the competition is fierce and it’s very hard to differentiate your product from others. My suggestion: Spend plenty of time up-front figuring out how to get above the noise with factors you can control.

Long story short, if you’ve even remotely entertained the idea of building an iPhone app, this post is a must read.

Thanks to the folks at FastFigures for opening up and providing this valuable insight into the process.

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