Category: mentorship

Portland’s Women Led seeks mastermind participants

I’m a firm believer that founders do best with multiple forms of mentorship. And peer mentorship is a critical component of a well-rounded mentor pool for any founders. That’s why I’m always glad to see organizations furthering the model. Like Women Led, which is looking for participants in their mastermind groups.

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Need mentorship to move from tech skilled to tech employable? LaunchCode can help

Even with all of the amazing code schools—both online and in person—there’s still a significant gap between being proficient in software development and employable in software development. But where are folks supposed to get the guidance and experience they need to close the gap? That’s what LaunchCode is working to do with its Liftoff: All-In<tech> initiative.

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Mentors, user groups, and seed funding: Portland Development Commission finishes up the startup and tech community conversation

For all the awesomeness that is the Portland startup and tech scene, there are still a few things that could use a little work. Things like finding mentors to help startups and founders find success. Establishing funding—like the Portland Seed Fund—to help sustain the efforts of entrepreneurs. And providing space for ad hoc and organized groups and events to gather.

Well, the Portland Development Commission (PDC) wants to help solve those problems. All of them. Because it’s really only a combination of all of them that will help us build a sustainable startup environment around here. But to do that, the PDC needs your feedback, please. Read More

Oregon technology startups and education: Being part of the solution

A few weeks back, I wrote a rant about the abysmal state of Oregon’s tech education in which I encouraged anyone in tech—but especially those folks at startups—to consider his/her potential role in helping to resolve the issues currently plaguing our educational system.

Talk, as they say, is cheap.

So how can we act?

Well, admittedly, this is an awfully big problem, but to wax—and perhaps unintentionally slaughter—more platitudes, the journey of 1000 miles begins with one step.

And, I’m proud to say that we, as a burgeoning collective, have already taken two:

  1. Oregon Tech & Education is an online discussion group designed to gather interested parties, encourage discussion, and facilitate action. If you are at all interested in helping, participating, or just watching what’s happening. I encourage you to join. Even if you just lurk. And I encourage you to invite the teachers and administrators in your life to join, as well.
  2. Silicon Florist internship/mentorship challenge is a call to all Silicon-Forest-based startups to consider offering a summer internship for high school or college students in your area. No one knows more about what you do than you. And teaching someone who knows nothing about what you do could be one of the most rewarding things you ever accomplish as an entrepreneur. If you’re interested—not even yet to the “willing to participate” phase, just interested—please throw your hat into the ring as one of the participating startups.

From time to time, I’ll keep you posted on these steps, and other steps that the resourceful folks of the Silicon Forest are taking to resolve this issue.

I’m looking forward to seeing what we can accomplish.

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