Category: Survey

What would you want in a online resource for Portland startups?

You know me, I’m always a fan of people who stop talking about doing something and actually start doing something. Even if other folks have tried to do that something before. So when a group of folks approached me with the idea of creating an online resource for startups in our community, what did I say?

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Mentors, user groups, and seed funding: Portland Development Commission finishes up the startup and tech community conversation

For all the awesomeness that is the Portland startup and tech scene, there are still a few things that could use a little work. Things like finding mentors to help startups and founders find success. Establishing funding—like the Portland Seed Fund—to help sustain the efforts of entrepreneurs. And providing space for ad hoc and organized groups and events to gather.

Well, the Portland Development Commission (PDC) wants to help solve those problems. All of them. Because it’s really only a combination of all of them that will help us build a sustainable startup environment around here. But to do that, the PDC needs your feedback, please. Read More

Survey: Which Silicon Forest startup organizations do you find most helpful?

If you’ve got a few seconds, I’d really appreciate your providing your opinion on the Silicon Forest organizations that are doing the most to help startups.

[HTML1]With the City of Portland planning to spend more time helping startups, I got to thinking. “How are we helping startups, already?” I said to myself. “Not only that, but who’s doing a good job of it?”

Now, I easily rattled off any number of organizations who were focused on helping the Portland and Silicon Forest startup environment. But other than my own personal opinion, I couldn’t really gauge who was helping entrepreneurs succeed.

Clearly, I don’t know the answer to that question. But you know who does? You. That’s why I’m asking you to tell me. (And once you tell me, we can tell everyone else.) Read More

Beyond the Forest: A List Apart Survey for People Who Make Websites 2008

A List Apart Survey for People Who Make Websites 2008Likely if you’ve ever spent any time working in Web design and development—or if you’ve ever had the opportunity to wrestle with some CSS or make your code jump through some hoops—you’ve come across A List Apart.

In 1997, web developer Brian M. Platz and I started the A List Apart mailing list because we found the web design mailing lists that were already out there to be too contentious, too careerist, or too scattershot. There was too much noise, too little signal. We figured, if we created something we liked better, maybe other people would like it too. Within months, 16,000 designers, developers, and content specialists had joined our list.

It’s fairly safe to say that there are few more influential sites out there when it comes to developing and designing the Web.

So when A List Apart puts up a survey and asks for participation, I listen. And I think you should, too.

Calling all designers, developers, information architects, project managers, writers, editors, marketers, and everyone else who makes websites. It is time once again to pool our information so as to begin sketching a true picture of the way our profession is practiced worldwide.

Last year’s A List Apart survey garnered more than 33,000 responses and has helped provide a better picture of the Web industry as a whole.

Given Portland’s proclivity for Web development, I think it’s important that we participate. En masse. So I’d like to second A List Apart’s call.

Please take a few moments to respond to the A List Apart Survey for People Who Make Websites 2008.

What does the Portland tech community look like?

While a good number of us here in Portland tend to interact on Twitter or via blog comments or at events, it’s rare that we’re all in the same place at the same time. So getting a comprehensive picture of the “Portland tech community” has been difficult, at best.

So what do geeks do to solve that problem? We employ technology.

Audrey Eschright has put together a Legion of Tech survey that will give us a view into the Portland tech community, in terms of the demographics and general foci of the folks living and working here in the Portland community.

It’s goals, according to Audrey, are pretty straightforward: get some semblance of an idea about who we are and what it is we do.

If you’re in Portland, and involved with any kind of technology activities for work or fun, please go to http://moourl.com/lotsurvey. The more responses, the better, since we want to see the breadth of our community, and whether Legion of Tech events are on your calendar. Tell your friends, coworkers, and neighbors.

If you consider yourself part of the Portland tech community—or if you’d like to be part of the Portland tech community—please take a few moments to walk through the Portland tech community survey.

I’ll make sure to highlight the results in a future post.

To-do: Name that stealthy Portland startup

It’s Friday. Isn’t it? It is right? I’ve kinda lost track of time.

What’s that? It is? Okay, great. In Portland, too? Okay, cool.

Ahem.

It’s Friday, so why not give yourself a little treat?

Ryan Williams of NetworthIQ fame has a new project in the works. It’s stealth. Super stealth.

Well, that’s what I’m claiming, anyway. Because the project doesn’t have a name. And in my book, you can’t be much more stealth than that.

Worse yet? He doesn’t quite know what to call it.

So you get to help.

Which is the best domain name for a site that aggregates feeds from traditional and social sites for a city?

  • socialmetro.com
  • metbuzz.com
  • vibelocal.com
  • localsignal.com

Exercise your inner-entrepreneur—or your outer one for that matter—by swinging by Ryan’s blog, Web things considered, and placing your vote. Or suggesting a new name.

[Update] Ryan was nice enough to drop by a provide a link to the work-in-progress. Might provide a little more inspiration for your vote.

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