Baby needs a COO

Word around the campfire It has been confirmed that CD Baby is looking for a short-term Chief Operating Officer (COO). Details about the position are as follows:

CD Baby (cdbaby.com) is looking for a short-term COO with possibility of becoming President.

CD Baby is one of the largest sellers of independent music online, providing retail sales and digital distribution for 200,000 musicians, with over $60M in sales. (And despite what you hear about the rest of the industry, sales are up 35% over last year, here.)

80 employees: 35 warehouse, 30 customer service, 5 digital distribution, 4 managers, and a few mysterious elves.

No music experience needed. We’ve got plenty of musicians here, and are looking for someone with a long proven history leading companies of a similar size, showing drastic operational improvements in a short timeframe.

Some of the areas you’ll be focusing on will be: developing and streamlining processes, improving customer service metrics, and leading the employees through the changes.

We’re looking for you to develop the plan, put it in action, and define the results.

This is a 3-month intensive project and pays $50,000.

You will report directly to CD Baby owner/founder Derek Sivers, and need to provide measurements to prove your operational improvements.

To apply, please send specifics of your history of operational improvements in a leadership role, whether COO, VP, President, or CEO – to jobs@CompassHumanResources.com.

Portland-based CD Baby describes itself as a “little online record store that sells albums by independent musicians.” That little store also happens to be one of the largest sellers of independent music on the Web. It is brother (or possibly sister) to Film Baby and Host Baby.

More information will be posted when available. In the meantime For more information about CD Baby, please refer to the CD Baby site or the CDBaby Wikipedia page for additional information.

Jive Software wins 14th Annual Oregon Entrepreneur Network (OEN) award

Word around the (Twitter) campfire is that Jive has walked away with the top honors at the Oregon Entrepreneur Network’s (OEN) 14th Annual Entrepreneurship awards. [Update] Jason Grigsby has published the complete OEN-award-winners list on User First Web. [Update 2] And the OEN has dropped a release, announcing the winners.

The statewide entrepreneurial community’s biggest gathering of the year will be the 2007 OEN Entrepreneurship Awards — the 14th annual celebration of the entrepreneurial spirit in action throughout Oregon and Southwest Washington.

The Oregon Entrepreneurs Network (OEN) is a not-for-profit organization dedicated to improving the climate for emerging, growth-oriented companies across Oregon and the Pacific Northwest. OEN helps improve the flow of ideas, services, and capital to entrepreneurs and helps connect companies to expertise and other resources they need to grow their business. Together, the nearly 2,500 members strive to aid the growth and development of a healthy, diversified Oregon economy with a new generation of entrepreneurial leaders.

This is hot off the… well, it’s not even on the presses yet, so I’ll update this post with additional links as news becomes available.

(Hat tip Jason Grigsby)

Ignite Portland: October 25, Wieden+Kennedy

It’s official! Ignite Portland has set its date and location: October 25 at Wieden+Kennedy.

We have a confirmed date and venue! Ignite Portland will happen on Thursday, October 25, 2007, at Wieden & Kennedy (224 NW 13th Ave, Portland, OR). Exact time TBD, but it will be in the evening, around 6PM to 9PM. The WK space is AMAZING – many thanks to Renny Gleeson and everyone at Wieden & Kennedy for being willing to host us.

That means you (yes, you) have got stuff to do, like:

For more information, see the Ignite Portland site. To stay up-to-date on the latest news, subscribe to the Ignite Portland feed.

In case you missed it: Speeding up Web performance, DevGroup NW

Last night, Jason Grigsby presented at DevGroup NW on techniques for optimizing and improving Web performance.

We had an exceptional audience tonight at DevGroup NW for my presentation on how to speed up web pages. There were a lot of good questions and an engaged audience. Thank you to everyone who showed up.

If you—like me—were unable to make it, fear not. You can now download the presentation (with or without speaker’s notes) from Jason’s site, User First Web.

(Hat tip to Peat Bakke)

Stealth: Imindi thought engine

Currently in stealth mode but scheduled to launch in the coming weeks, Portland-based Imindi promises to bring the visual aspects of traditional mind-mapping software to a broader spectrum of activities. The aggressive product vision, outlined on the Imindi blog, has the product helping with everything from collaborative writing to collaborative search to social bookmarking.

At its foundation, the company describes the Imindi product as a “thought engine”:

The Imindi Thought Engine enables you to input your Thoughts and the semantic connections between them (Why, What, Where, When, Who, How) in a naturally radiant fashion with one thought radiating outward to one or many asoociated thought that themselves radiates outwards towards other thoughts which radiate outwards towards others and so on and so forth. The interface is essentially a visual map of your mind what we call a “Journey” here at Imindi.

The concept is interesting. But it is important to note that the visual aspect of the mind-map is not especially expansive—at least at this point. Currently, the Imindi product relegates the results to the first orbit, the items within direct connection of the central thought.

Personally, I’ve always found the value of graphic representations of the nature to be the orbits that are 3 to 4 steps away from the initial thought. This is where you start seeing the really interesting stuff happening.

With Imindi’s current product, you can definitely get to that point—one a click at a time–but as far as I can tell, you cannot currently see the entire universe or the path that led you to your current thought. [Update] The Imindi folks were nice enough to swing by and comment on the exact functionality I was seeking: expanded maps.

Obviously, is that it’s incredibly easy for me to sit here and pitch stones with no idea of how much work the algorithms and relationship logic actually took. So, while I criticize, I’d encourage you to take a look for yourself by visiting Imindi.

Imindi has received seed funding from Mind Fund of Portland.

Portland tech startup co-op, concept proposed

As any small company or individual developer discovers, there are a number of requirements to “running a business” that often detract or steal time from your “building cool and useful stuff” time. And while many developers currently outsource these tasks to business-service professionals, the cost and time to manage those services and contractors can be equally draining.

Peat Bakke of Blue Hill Solutions and Adam DuVander may have a solution: a co-op that supports the business-services needs of small and independent technology developers in the Portland area.

There are lots of independent software developers and consultants in the Portland area, and while the technologies and applications vary wildly, there are probably some very common frustrations that could be aided under a co-op structure.

Sounds like an idea whose time has come. A sort of “Really Small Business Administration” to fill the gap for the market that the local SBA isn’t really designed to serve.

The concept is interesting—and appealing—to say the least. If you agree, read Peat’s post on the topic and then head over to Portland Web Innovators to join the discussion.

Reminder: Portland Open Coffee, September 19

Just a reminder that the Portland Open Coffee meetup will be held, bright and early, at 10 AM on September 19. The meeting spot will be the Stumptown on Division.

According to Upcoming, there are currently a bevy of watchers and only a few attendees.

The OpenCoffee Club was started to encourage entrepreneurs, developers and investors to organise real-world informal meetups to chat, network and grow.

Platial uses new API for latest build, new look

Portland-based Platial, one of the original social-mapping and map-mashup sites, has announced that the latest build of their mapping tool has completed BETA testing and is now available to the general public.

While the most obvious changes are to the Platial interface, the most interesting part of the release—at least from my perspective—is that it marks the first build on the new Platial API.

It’s also the first major release on our new code framework Chris and Jake developed using our new api which Chris pretty much single handedly created

Some stability issues have been addressed under the hood, as well:

The reason we’re all so excited is that both the code base and the UI are more solid than ever (also lots of back-end tweaking and turning are targeting content eve[n] more effectively!). This was a methodical build and is just the first on the new solid framework which is going to allow us to be even faster and even more responsive to our amazing users!! Now that the Platial platform is for a good part established we can finally obsess over the details.

Platial enables anyone to find, create and use meaningful maps of Places that matter to them. The goal of the site is to connect people, neighborhoods, cities and countries through a citizen-driven common context that goes beyond geopolitical boundaries.

Local Signal: Portland-focused start page

Portland-based application developer Ryan Williams’ formerly-yet-to-be-named news tool now has both a name, Local Signal, and some publicly available functionality.

Even in its rough form, you’ll get the gist.

The Pageflakes-esque and Netvibes-y tool takes the “personalized start page” concept to a regional level, providing a wealth of Portland-oriented content, right out of the proverbial box.

It’s a resource Williams has been seeking. When he was unable to find one that met his needs, he decided to build one. And he’s being very open about the development process.

The UI/Design is still in progress, but you can get a good idea of the purpose and the content. I’d love to hear what you guys think. Is it interesting? Worthless? Is there some content this is missing?

For more information on the project, see the Portland Web Innovators discussion or Williams’ blog, Web Things Considered.

LUNARR landing

After operating for two years in stealth mode, LUNARR stepped into the light, last night, unveiling its collaboration-oriented product offering to a crowd of bloggers and other interested parties in its hometown, Portland, Oregon.

For a week where all tech eyes seem to be on the little Arrington-Calacanis get-together down south, LUNARR is pulling down some pretty impressive coverage.

As always, I’ll work to roundup all of the posts that I can. Here’s what I’ve found, so far:

If you’ve written about LUNARR, and I’ve (inadvertently) missed your post, link it up in the comments below. I’ll make sure to add it to this list.For more on LUNARR, see the product descriptions on the LUNARR site.

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