Tag: black

Talking business and investment with Stephen Green

“It’s simple… but it’s not easy.” That’s how Portland’s Stephen Green describes running a business. So how do you make it easier? Stephen shares some tips for running and investing in any business — with a particular focus on Black businesses — as a guest on the Let’s Talk Marketing podcast with Nathan Webster.

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TiE Oregon appoints first Black board member, first in US

TiE Oregon, one of the critical support organizations for the Oregon startup community in terms of both funding and mentorship, has announced the appointment of Lateef Jackson to its Board of Directors. Lateef is the first Black board member of any of the 22 TiE chapters throughout North America.

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A Kids Book About releases a discounted Black History Month bundle

If you’ve been thinking about purchasing a few titles from A Kids Book About, now would be the time to do it. Although “a few” may be an understatement. The A Kids Book About Black History Month bundle features 13 titles.

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Celebrating Black owned Oregon businesses during Black History Month

It’s become a bit of tradition around here. Started by Stephen Green and accompanied by the Built Oregon social media presence, February is focused on helping to raise the visibility of some of the amazing Black owned businesses in Oregon — startup or otherwise. As always, I’ll compile a recap at the end of the month. But if you’d like to follow along, day by day, that would be awesome.

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Portland Venture Capital fund Black Founders Matter gets write up in The New York Times

While I’m extremely lucky to get the opportunity to see all kinds of amazing founders and companies here in Portland, it’s always nice when they’re recognized on a larger stage. Like today, when Marceau Michel and his venture capital fund, Black Founders Matter, were featured in The New York Times.

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Suddenly one Portlander — and one former Portlander — have a potential $50k startup investment burning a hole in their pockets

Now, it’s no secret that I’m a fan of Indie.vc. The way they’re rethinking traditional venture capital is right in line with the way companies are built around here. And their focus on generating revenue and founders retaining control has an appeal as well. So just imagine how much more of a fan I became when I heard that someone from Portland and someone who used to live in Portland were selected to help invest some Indie.vc capital.

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Black Founders Matter cuts first check for A Kids Book About

Speaking of new venture capital funds in Portland… Granted everything is pretty grim right now. And energy is hard to come by. Let alone optimism. So when there is a glimmer of something hopeful in the Portland startup community, that seems like something to celebrate. Like Portland’s Black Founders Matter fund making its first investment. In a Black founded Portland startup. And then that news making it into TechCrunch.

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What is the Black tech experience post COVID-19, George Floyd, and Breonna Taylor?

For many folks, there’s more than the pandemic of COVID-19 affecting their lives. There are the equally damaging pandemics of systemic racism. And police violence. And exclusionary tactics and unconscious bias of the so-called “meritocracy” of startups and technology companies. So with all of these contributing factors colliding, what does the immediate future look like for Blacks in tech?

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REMINDER: Need something more to “Do”?

A few weeks ago, Stephen Green launched a new grassroots movement designed to leverage the momentum of the Black Lives Matter movement and empower individuals to help change the trajectory of diversity, equity, and inclusion in the Portland business community, startups among them. It called upon folks to “Do. Do more. Do better.” And it’s grown to several hundred folks in Portland who are committed to doing the work.

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A framework for racial equity in startup ecosystems

As we continue to assess the potential recovery from this global pandemic, we’re also in the midst of beginning to address the systemic racism that plagues institutions, processes, and ecosystems in the startup world. To that end, Dell Gines, Senior Community Development Advisor for the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, and Rodney Sampson, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer for The Opportunity Hub, have recently published a framework that combines those two efforts entitled “Building racial equity in tech ecosystems to spur local recovery.”

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