Tag: Survey

Looking to share your knowledge about Portland? Look no further than the PortlandWiki

Everyday there are new awesome things happening in Portland. Things that matter to people in Portland. Things that change and form the very core of what Portland is. But how can anyone keep track of all this amazing information about our fair city?

Well, that’s why we have PortlandWiki. Read More

REMINDER: Last chance to respond to last software community survey from the Portland Development Commission

I know, I know. You’re already halfway to your Halloween costume and candy coma. But I was wondering if I might take just a few seconds of your time before you build up another pile of fun size wrappers on your desk?

The Portland Development Commission’s last survey to get a pulse on the Portland software community’s needs closes today. That’s right. Today. So take your sugar-infused self on over to the survey and answer a few questions. Read More

Survey, survey, who has the survey? Portland Development Commission (PDC) does. For you. Again.

Remember a few months back when you took that Portland Development Commission (PDC) survey about the state of the Portland software market? Remember the kerfuffle—albeit a justified one—that took place immediately following the release of the results?

Well, as planned, the PDC has released the next instantiation of the survey, designed to dive deeper into some of the questions and to keep the conversation with the software community going. Oh, yeah, you saw where I was going, didn’t you? Yeah. Well. Would you? Would you please take a moment to respond to the PDC software survey? Read More

Town Hall: Discuss the results of the initial Portland Development Commission (PDC) software cluster survey

So now the town hall discussion will be held this Wednesday, May 26, beginning at 4:30 PM at Wieden + Kennedy (who was kind enough to offer up the space given that the PDC was booked).

As you may know, the Portland Development Commission (PDC) is currently engaged in a project designed to help them assess and better understand the state and size of the software industry in Portland. To this end, they have engaged the community in an initial survey and they have plans for at least two others.

Originally, the PDC wanted to discuss these results with the community last week. But when several parties mentioned that it conflicted with WebVisions, PDC took that feedback to heart and rescheduled. So now the town hall discussion will be held this Wednesday, May 26, beginning at 4:30 PM at Wieden + Kennedy (who was kind enough to offer up the space given that the PDC was booked). Read More

REMINDER: Take a few seconds to respond to the Portland software community census

Because there has been no measurement of that group. Until now. The Portland software community census is designed to take a stab at coming up with that magic number.

When I talk about the Portland software development and open source scenes, one of the first questions I always get—always—is “Sounds interesting. About how many people in Portland are involved in the software community there?”

And inevitably, as that question hangs in the air, I stare blankly. Smile feebly. And say, “A lot. There are a lot.” Because fact of the matter is: we have no idea. Maybe there are 50,000. Maybe there are 200. There’s no telling. Because there has been no measurement of that group. Until now. The Portland software community census is designed to take a stab at coming up with that magic number. Read More

Portland Development Commission (PDC) releases initial results from Software cluster survey

Remember a few weeks back, when I asked you—well, actually, implored you, begged you—to respond to a survey about the current state of software development? You remember, the one sponsored by the Portland Development Commission (PDC) (@pdxdevelopment)?

Well a whole bunch of you took the time to respond. (Thank you!) And now the PDC has released the results of the survey. Read More

SAO survey results: Folks want more small and focused peer events… with beer

And while it will come as little shock to anyone in the startup scene, the feedback says that SAO members would like… (drum roll please) exactly what the folks in the startup tech scene have been doing: smaller informal discussions at brew pubs.

You may remember the Software Association of Oregon survey I mentioned a few months back. You know the one. The one where the SAO was looking to get some feedback on what direction they should be pursuing? Remember? Well, you must. Because more than 40% of the respondents weren’t even SAO members—and I have to assume that means that you were likely one of those who responded.

Well in any case, the results are in. And they’ve been all munched and crunched and whatnot. And while it will come as little shock to anyone in the startup scene, the feedback says that SAO members would like… (drum roll please) exactly what the folks in the startup tech scene have been doing: smaller informal discussions at brew pubs. Read More

Survey: Which Silicon Forest startup organizations do you find most helpful?

If you’ve got a few seconds, I’d really appreciate your providing your opinion on the Silicon Forest organizations that are doing the most to help startups.

[HTML1]With the City of Portland planning to spend more time helping startups, I got to thinking. “How are we helping startups, already?” I said to myself. “Not only that, but who’s doing a good job of it?”

Now, I easily rattled off any number of organizations who were focused on helping the Portland and Silicon Forest startup environment. But other than my own personal opinion, I couldn’t really gauge who was helping entrepreneurs succeed.

Clearly, I don’t know the answer to that question. But you know who does? You. That’s why I’m asking you to tell me. (And once you tell me, we can tell everyone else.) Read More

Survey: OTBC needs your feedback

OTBCOur friends over at the Beaverton-based OTBC are always trying to help startups and entrepreneurs in the Portland area—like by hosting entrepreneurial speed dating sessions and sponsoring events like Portland Lunch 2.0 and Open Source Bridge.

Now, the OTBC could use a little bit of our help. In the form of feedback:

We get input at our lunches, and through our Meetup.com site, but we’d like to round that out with input from a larger sample of the Portland area tech entrepreneur community. So please take three minutes to let us know what kinds of programs you’d like to attend. These are mostly ratings of 1-to-5 to show interest level in a topic. Lots of ideas are listed, but it goes fast. Really! Three minutes. (OK, maybe four minutes at the outside.) Thanks!

I know you can help, because everyone has an opinion. They’re like… well, everyone has one.

So take a few minutes out of your busy schedule and click some buttons. The OTBC—and our entire startup community—will be better for it.

[HTML1]

Beyond the Forest: A List Apart Survey for People Who Make Websites 2008

A List Apart Survey for People Who Make Websites 2008Likely if you’ve ever spent any time working in Web design and development—or if you’ve ever had the opportunity to wrestle with some CSS or make your code jump through some hoops—you’ve come across A List Apart.

In 1997, web developer Brian M. Platz and I started the A List Apart mailing list because we found the web design mailing lists that were already out there to be too contentious, too careerist, or too scattershot. There was too much noise, too little signal. We figured, if we created something we liked better, maybe other people would like it too. Within months, 16,000 designers, developers, and content specialists had joined our list.

It’s fairly safe to say that there are few more influential sites out there when it comes to developing and designing the Web.

So when A List Apart puts up a survey and asks for participation, I listen. And I think you should, too.

Calling all designers, developers, information architects, project managers, writers, editors, marketers, and everyone else who makes websites. It is time once again to pool our information so as to begin sketching a true picture of the way our profession is practiced worldwide.

Last year’s A List Apart survey garnered more than 33,000 responses and has helped provide a better picture of the Web industry as a whole.

Given Portland’s proclivity for Web development, I think it’s important that we participate. En masse. So I’d like to second A List Apart’s call.

Please take a few moments to respond to the A List Apart Survey for People Who Make Websites 2008.

%d bloggers like this: