Tag: video games

Portland creative uses video game to express the frustration of unwanted hair touching

Video games hold a great deal of potential for engaging folks on a variety of different levels. But, to be honest, that potential is often squandered. So that’s why it’s incredibly refreshing to see other uses for the medium—like effectively communicating the emotions and frustrations of others. Take Hair Nah, a online game from Portland’s Momo Pixel that provides insight into a common annoyance for black people: uninvited hair touching.

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Interested in the video game industry in Oregon? Game On

Like many folks in Oregon, the video game community is creative, passionate, and, well, aggressively humble. But once a year, Oregon Games Organization takes the opportunity to make a little more noise than usual. To talk about what’s happening. And to celebrate some of the amazing folks in this community. It’s time for Game On. Read More

Rose City (Tetris) 'Til I Die

The Portland Timbers are no strangers to the world of video games. I mean, they had that little game where Timber Joey bravely lopped of the heads of encroaching Seattle Flounders. But now, the Timbers Army is getting their own treatment, inspired by something for which the Army is well known—one of its chants. Read More

Portland indie video game XO finds fans … and the funding needed to bring it to reality

One of the most interesting things about running Kickstarter campaigns, in my opinion, is the validation—or lack thereof—of an idea. Obviously, the funding is helpful. But the realization that other folks believe in what you’re doing and believe that you should keep doing it? That’s the real magic. And now, a new Portland indie video game, has gotten both the validation and the funding it needs. Meet XO. Read More

… and I thought playing video games on the OMSI Omnimax screen was epic. Meet CTRL ALT PDX.

Okay. Admittedly, playing games on the OMSI Omnimax screen is still absolutely epic. But, playing them on the side of a building? That ain’t half bad either. And that’s exactly what’s happening this Friday at 7:30PM—and for the next month or so after sundown—as part of CTRL ALT PDX. Read More

It is pitch black. You're unlikely to be eaten by a grue. Meet Mayday! Deep Space.

Without getting too philosophical. There are times. (NOTE: This is getting too philosophical, already.) There are times when you’re kind of there in a moment. And you realize that your perception has been nudged. Maybe tweaked. Maybe changed. But definitely nudged. And it’s some crazy work of art that has managed to do it. And I’ll be damned if Mayday! Deep Space hasn’t managed to do that to me. Read More

More than just a game: Oregon Video Game Association begins to form

There are those rare times. You know, the ones. The ones when you know you’ve been lucky enough to be around at the formative stages. Times were you knew that you were witnessing the beginning of something special. You could feel the momentum building. And that’s just what it felt like tonight at OMSI as video game developers from around Oregon gathered. Read More

Oregon video game industry says Game On

Oregon has a long—and unfortunately not as celebrated as it should be—history with video games. For years, Eugene has had a wealth of talent with a series of name brand companies pursuing game development there. And Portland’s amazing indie gaming scene has been growing by leaps and bounds. Read More

Game on: Oregon Film tax credits now apply to video games as well

There’s something interesting happening in Portland around “digital storytelling” that feels very similar to the tech startup scene a decade ago. And it’s gaining momentum. The latest hint is that the Oregon Governor’s Board of Film and Television—or Oregon Film, for short—now has permission to give tax credits to video game and post production houses. Read More

iPhone-based Fieldrunners named one of Time’s top 10 video games of 2008

FieldrunnersPortland’s mobile development chops continue to gain attention. This time it’s an addictive iPhone app built by Portland-based Subatomic Studios.

It seems that almost everyone who plays Fieldrunners—a strategic tower defense game—gets a little bit addicted to it. Even the writers at Time Magazine. So much so, in fact, that—even though the app was only released a little over two months ago—it has been named one of Time’s top 10 video games for 2008.

Not iPhone games, mind you. Video games. Period.

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Why do they like it?

With the opening of the App Store and the release of development tools, third-party developers have converted the iPhone and the iPod Touch into handheld gaming devices that will soon be serious competition for the Nintendo DS and Sony’s PSP. The pick of the first litter is Fieldrunners, a fast and furious tower defense game that looks great on those super-bright, super-crisp screens and seamlessly integrates the famous touchscreen as a game controller.

Pretty high praise—and definitely mainstream exposure—for some great development happening here in Portland. Now, if we can just get them to look up from the game long enough to see the other cool stuff that’s happening here.

To download the app for your iPhone or iPod Touch, go to Fieldrunners in the App Store.

(Hat tip to Steven Osborn)

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