Tag: y combinator

Are you a Portland area startup going through YC Startup School?

In case you missed it, yesterday was one of those rare Oprah-giving-everyone-a-car sort of days in the early stage startup world. You see, Y Combinator—the most successful startup accelerator in the world—had a glitch that caused them to send acceptance letters to applicants for their Startup School program. And it wasn’t just a handful of folks. Estimates are that it was around 15,000 applicants.

Read More

Building a startup not stressful enough for you? Good. Here are looming accelerator deadlines.

Whether it’s the first time you’ve built a company or the fifth, every early stage founder wants to take every advantage available. And for some folks, accelerators and incubators can be a beneficial means of getting that much needed help in a very concentrated format. But you can’t get in if you don’t apply, so maybe consider these looming accelerator deadlines. Read More

Data, Culture, Networks, People: Learnings from Etsy, Code for America, and Y Combinator

Portland is lucky to have a bunch of awesome people swinging through all throughout the year. And every once in a while, we’re lucky enough to get one of them to hang out and chat about their experiences.

This time it’s Paul deGrandis, who’s going to share his thoughts on Data, Culture, Networks, People, this Tuesday, February 21, at 6PM. Read More

Whether you’re interested in Y Combinator or not, startups should watch this Paul Graham interview

Pay attention startups. You should be making something that makes people’s lives better. It’s that easy. Want big valuations? Want venture capital? That’s all it takes.

Don’t believe me? Well don’t believe me. Believe the guy who said it, Paul Graham, the tech entrepreneur behind a little incubator you might have heard about called Y Combinator. Read More

New to Portland: Perspective on the Portland Seed Fund launch

[Editor: So, the Portland Seed Fund is now open. Providing a new funding mechanism for fledgling Portland startups. And we here, who have been anxiously awaiting the opening of the fund, are excited about this endeavor, it makes me wonder how people outside of Portland are receiving it.

Well, enter Dale Davidson, a recent Portland transplant who attended the launch. Here’s his guest post on the event and some of his thoughts on the fund.] Read More

Watch Y Combinator grads CarWoo and Cloudkick and the Portland Seed Fund launch from the comfort of your browser

When you have a line up with two successful Y Combinator companies like CarWoo and Cloudkick and the launch of the Portland Seed Fund, the venue can fill up pretty quickly. And that’s exactly what happened with tonight’s event.

But anyone who knows Portland knows that we’re all about making sure everyone gets a chance to participate. So even if you can’t get in or if you’re out of town or whatever, you’ll be able to tune in to the Portland Seed Fund launch party—all from the comfort of your Web browser. Read More

Oregon Y Combinator companies CarWoo and Cloudkick to help launch Portland Seed Fund

Since its inception, the Portland Seed Fund has held with it the promise to fill a much need role in the Portland startup scene—the ability to provide small amounts of capital to burgeoning young startups that might not yet be ready for larger rounds. And while I’ve been critical of the some of the original positioning around the Fund, I’ve eagerly awaited and supported the Portland Seed Fund team as they’ve worked to put the program together.

Now, the Portland Seed Fund has reached the point that they’re ready to accept applications. And to open with a bang, they’ve brought a couple of former Oregon companies—who also happen to be Y Combinator alums—to help celebrate the milestone. Read More

Miss out on Darius Monsef’s fireside chat at PIE? Don Park captured it for you

As everyone knows, there are always a ton of tech events happening in Portland on any given day. And it’s difficult to make it to most of them. But luckily there are folks like Don Park who take the opportunity to capture the moment.

So if you missed the get together with Darius Monsef of COLOURlovers, last week at PIE, fear not. Don managed to capture a pretty good audio stream of the event—and some video. It’s well worth a listen.

Take a few minutes to hear Darius—and the entire COLOURlovers team—talk about Y Combinator, the Portland startup scene, and getting your ideas out there.
Read More

Portland Seed Fund: Y Combinator, it’s not. (Unconstitutional, it may be.)

Portland Seed Fund claims to be loosely based on Y Combinator. I think they may be using the term “loosely” loosely. And it may be unconstitutional in Oregon.

[HTML1]There comes a time—not often mind you—but there comes a time when even I—admittedly often naively optimistic in my cheerleading of the Portland startup scene—have to admit that something just isn’t right. This is one of those times.

Over the weekend, Mike Rogoway at The Oregonian published an overview piece on the new Portland Seed Fund, a project designed to help provide funding for bootstrapping startups to get their legs under them. It’s not Mike’s piece with which I have trouble. I was happy to see it. That with which I have trouble is the Portland Seed Fund comparing its program to Y Combinator, an incubator and mentoring program for tech startups. Read More

Y Combinator founder likes Portland’s potential for startups

Can Portland become a startup hub? It’s a question that we discuss time and time again.

We have the hackers, but can we attract the right kind of investors? Can we create a startup environment that meshes with the Portland—and Silicon Forest—culture? Can we build a sustainable startup engine?

I believe we can and I know I’m not alone in that regard.

Now, Paul Graham, founder of the well-known early stage startup incubator Y Combinator, has provided another vote of confidence for the Rose City. In a post entitled “Can You Buy a Silicon Valley? Maybe.” he proposes a way to fund and retain startups “for a particular city.”

It’s an interesting argument. But what I found most interesting was this (emphasis is mine):

How well this scheme worked would depend on the city. There are some towns, like Portland, that would be easy to turn into startup hubs, and others, like Detroit, where it would really be an uphill battle. So be honest with yourself about the sort of town you have before you try this.

So now, it’s not just obvious to us, anymore. It’s obvious to the outside world, as well.

It seems like there’s an opportunity here. And we shouldn’t squander it.

(Hat tip Elia Freedman)

%d bloggers like this: