Category: Healthcare

Healthcare startup? Healthcare mentor? Join PIE at The Dairy Building for the Accelerate Biotech & Digital Health Happy Hour

Digital healthcare has long been one of Portland’s strongest areas of startup success and support. But like so many awesome Portland things, it’s also a tightly knit community for which it can be difficult to figure out where to start. That’s why OTRADI Oregon Bioscience Incubator started a regular happy hour. So that making those connections could be easier.

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REMINDER: Accelerate Biotech and Digital Health Happy Hour, February 1

As tech becomes more pervasive, we’re seeing more and more interesting, inspiring, and innovative solutions from any number of verticals in Portland. But if I had to pick a sector that has the most momentum and potential, I’d have to say biotech. And nowhere is the potential of that community better showcased and celebrated than the monthly Accelerate Biotech and Digital Health Happy Hour.

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Wisdom (and health) of the crowd: Portland's Consano is changing the way medical research is funded with crowdfunding

The concept of crowdfunding has changed—or utterly disrupted—any number of industries. But what about healthcare? Can taking medical research funding to the crowd prove to be a viable means of changing the industry? Portland’s Consano is convinced it can be. Read More

Calling Oregon entrepreneurs to action: Do-it-yourself healthcare reform

From friends who own small traditional businesses to my tech entrepreneur friends, most are aghast at how severely they’ve been hit by healthcare cost increases. It’s simply unsustainable. This post will outline an alternative approach to getting your healthcare needs met that may be a better route for you and your organization.

[HTML4][Editor’s Note: Dave Chase provides us with another guest post. This time, he focuses on what entrepreneurs can do to reform the US healthcare system. It’s an area near and dear to his heart and, as you’ll see, where his latest startup is focused.]

Imagine a cost in your business or personal budget that grew 3400% faster than all other costs. Would you do something about it? That is what has happened to healthcare costs over the last 50 years. While other goods have gone up 8x in the last 50 years, healthcare has gone up 274x. Read More

Kryptiq partners with Surescripts to reinvent healthcare and gets some extra cash to boot

Kryptiq and Surescripts have envisioned a way to revolutionize the secure sharing of health information.

It’s always nice to see the kids do well. Especially when they’re the great grandkid of the Portland startup scene.

You see, Kryptiq is a descendant of a long line of Portland startups. Some folks started at Tektronix and then left to join startup Mentor Graphics. And then some of those folks from Mentor Graphics left to join startup MedicaLogic. And then MedicaLogic folks wound up at Kryptiq.

And today, that startup whippersnapper had some major news: Kryptiq and Surescripts have envisioned a way to revolutionize the secure sharing of health information. Read More

SweetSpot hits the… Oh. Um. Well, it secures seed funding for diabetes data services

When it comes to technology, health care, ironically, tends to fall closer to the rusting edge than the bleeding edge. But that shortcoming is a boon for startups that can figure out how to use today’s technology to solve health care’s problems—both for providers and patients.

One such company is Portland-based SweetSpot, a startup that seeks to help diabetics and their care givers better manage health information by providing a central resource for blood glucose tracking and reporting. And today, Sweetspot is one step closer that helping fix its own corner of health care, thanks to a round of seed funding. Read More

Health care geeks flock to Portland for open source CONNECT Code-a-thon

But all that changes on November 19 and 20, when Portland, OSU Open Source Labs, and PSU play host to the CONNECT Code-a-thon, a open source hacking session for health care tech types.

With OHSU, Portland has a great deal of prominence in the world of health care. And with open source, Portland has some street cred with the techie types. But events that get the health care and open source tech types intermingling? Not so much.

But all that changes on November 19 and 20, when Portland, OSU Open Source Labs, and PSU play host to the CONNECT Code-a-thon, a open source hacking session for health care tech types. Read More

Talking rocket surgery: Kryptiq lands secure communications for NASA flight surgeons

Suffice it to say that Kryptiq has landed a new client that means they’ll be flying high, for sure. With astronauts and stuff. You see, Kryptiq’s newest customer is the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA).

Hillsboro-based Kryptiq has always had high hopes for improving physician-client communications. But now those high hopes are reaching thermospheric levels. Or exospheric. Or whatever.

Enough of the fancy words. Suffice it to say that Kryptiq has landed a new client that means they’ll be flying high, for sure. With astronauts and stuff. You see, Kryptiq’s newest customer is the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). Read More

Health Information Technology: Why is it important to Portland?

I have long taken an outward-looking view and advocated that Portland could become a hub for health IT at the intersection of industry, academia, and its health care systems.

[Editor: Health Information Technology has always had a interesting spot in the Portland startup scene. And I say that, most likely, because I’ve been part of it from time to time. But I’m probably not the best person to write about it. Enter Bill Hersh, MD, Professor and Chair of the Department of Medical Informatics & Clinical Epidemiology (DMICE) in the School of Medicine at Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU) in Portland, Oregon. Here’s his perspective on HIT, its role, and its potential for the Portland tech scene.]

I appreciate the opportunity to contribute a piece to this blog about a topic of great interest to myself and many others, which is health information technology, also called health IT or HIT. Read More

Collaborative Software Initiative launches TriSano, an open-source means of tracking disease

TriSanoIn the world of technology, we complain about having to deal with “viruses” and “infected systems” all of the time. And, as such, we have any number of tools at our disposal for tracking, managing, and eliminating these viruses.

But what about using technology to deal with the impact of disease in the real world?

Portland-based Collaborative Software Initiative may have the answer with its newest effort, TriSano.

TriSano is designed to help communities collect and share disease information within and among communities:

To provide Public Health organizations freedom and choice when tasked with making an applications decision to support their communities. We offer the opportunity to scrap the monolithic development process and custom built solutions traditionally provided through system integrators and traditional software companies. Our suggestion: engage in the power of community building and open source technology to solve complex health technology challenges for the good of public health.

It’s like your own private Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). And, Utah already has plans to go live on TriSano.

But Dana Blankenhorn sees TriSano reaching much farther than that:

TriSano is written in Ruby. Rather than building 75 forms, TriSano built a form-builder. The system can be maintained by doctors, regulators, or through TriSano in the form of Software as a Service.

What it means is a faster, flexible, less-expensive system for creating and maintaining infectious disease reports. Utah will train its people first, CSI will seek to roll it out nationwide, and everyone (including you) will reap the benefits.

For all the appreciation I have for cool Web 2.0 tools, they remain—quite often—a frivolous applications of technologies that hold unlimited potential. And that’s why it’s especially exciting to see a local company tapping into that potential for the greater good of humanity.

Collaborative Software Initiative was founded in 2007 by Stuart Cohen, a veteran IT executive and former chief executive officer at the Open Source Development Labs. Cohen has partnered with Evan Bauer, financial services technology veteran and former chief technology officer at Credit Suisse, to bring together like-minded companies to build software applications at a fraction of the cost of traditional methods. The company introduces a market-changing process that applies open source methodologies to building software collaboratively. For more information, visit Collaborative Software Initiative.

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