Tag: Event

A more positive effect: Affect Conference opens early bird pricing and call for speakers

One of the things I appreciate about Portland is the way it rethinks conference formats. We have any number of examples from any number of small unconferences to gigantic things like the XOXO Festival. Now, there’s a new event in town that promises to gather folks from the design community while helping nonprofits at the same time. Meet Affect. Read More

Decisions, decisions: One Portland Startup Week event. That's all we ask.

I get it. First off, you’re super busy. Working on your startup. Building stuff. You’re heads down. You don’t have time to be lollygagging around all week, attending events. And even if you were thinking about attending Portland Startup Week, with more than 70 events from which to choose, it’s a bit daunting. Read More

Design Rocks: Ziggy played guitar. You can play a role in bringing him back from Mars

It’s always nice to see people breaking down silos. And crossing over genres. And media. Portland needs more of that. That’s why I’m intrigued by a local Indiegogo project looking for raise funds for a “Rock ’n’ Roll Art & Design Gala from Mars” to be held during Design Week Portland. Read More

Since there’s no blimp on Sunday, get your fill of dirigibles with Urban Airship on Saturday

So maybe you missed the first Portland Lunch 2.0 of the year. Maybe you’re really upset because you really, really wanted to see Urban Airship‘s new space in the former Ziba building. And now, you’re sitting there, sullen.

Well, that Super Bowl party isn’t your only entertainment this weekend. You have another chance to go hang out with the Urban Airship crew, see their new digs, and celebrate with the other tenants in their building with Urban Airship open house. Read More

WebVisions 2010: All the webby goodness at which you can shake a digital stick… and it could be free for you

One more week and all of the Web aficionados will be descending upon Portland for WebVisions, the premier Portland Web conference now in its tenth year.

Well well well. It’s about that time. One more week and all of the Web aficionados will be descending upon Portland for WebVisions, the premier Portland Web conference now in its tenth year.

It’s a chance to see people like Merlin Mann, Agnieszka Gasparska, and Luke Williams. As well as any number of local favorites. And now, you have the opportunity to see all those folks for free. Read More

Open Source Bridge opens registration for 2010 event

Registration just opened. And that means you can get a ticket to all of Open Source Bridge—and access to the 24-hour hacker lounge—for the early bird price $225. Or you can grab a one-day pass for $99.

If you like open source—and I’m betting you do—there’s no better or more affordable conference than Open Source Bridge, the entirely volunteer run conference designed for open source citizens. And the four-day event—held June 1 – 4, 2010 at the Portland Art Museum—is even more affordable if you act now.

That’s right. Registration just opened. And that means you can get a ticket to all of Open Source Bridge—and access to the 24-hour hacker lounge—for the early bird price $225. Or you can grab a one-day pass for $99. Read More

eROI expands its offerings with a simple and elegant event registration service

Enter Portland-based eROI with eROI Event, a simple, straightforward, and skinnable event registration service that lets you manage people, pricing, discounts without all the usual headaches.

[HTML2]When it comes to managing small events, finding a capable event registration system can be a bit of pain. There are any number of systems that provide the features you need but there’s always a drawback. Maybe you can’t muck with the design. Maybe you have problems with your own merchant account. Maybe it’s just a bit too wonky.

Whatever the case, there’s room for improvement. Enter Portland-based eROI with eROI Event, a simple, straightforward, and skinnable event registration service that lets you manage people, pricing, discounts without all the usual headaches. Read More

Open Source Bridge: Get involved in bridging the gap

We—and I’m using the royal “we”—were all a bit taken aback when O’Reilly decided to pull the plug on OSCON in Portland.

Was it something we said? Did we no longer have the “open source” cred? What did we do? Why hast thou forsaken us?

Confusion reined.

But it was only a momentary lapse.

You see, if there’s one thing I love about Portland, it’s our entrepreneurial spirit. We weren’t just going to sit around and cry in our microbrewed beers about it. We Portlanders are going to figure out how to do something else. We’ll show them.

And true to form, here’s Open Source Bridge, a new grassroots-organized open-source-developer-oriented conference that’s slated to be held in Portland, next summer.

What are we planning? I’m glad you asked. Let me let some of the Open Source Bridge organizers tell the story:

Selena Deckelmann writes:

I love conferences. And I love Portland. Maybe you can guess what’s coming next.

During an intense brainstorming session at Side Project To Startup, a group of concerned Portlanders drew together a plan for a new conference. We packed a tiny room, and had a heated discussion about what we wanted, what Portland needed, and how we might do it. By the end of the session, Audrey Eschright and I agreed to co-chair. And with the support of Portland’s incredible tech community, we knew we could make it happen.

Audrey Eschright writes:

I am excited to be co-chairing this event. Portland is a fabulous place to be working on open source projects, and we’re the ideal community to build an inclusive, diverse conference that focuses on developers’ interests and needs.

Dawn Foster offers:

Were you sad and dismayed to hear that OSCON was moving out of Portland? Are you looking for more open source events to attend? Would you like an open source conference organized by the community? Want one more tech event to attend in July? Need an excuse (any excuse) to visit lovely Portland, Oregon in July? Do you like to help organize events for fun in your spare time?

If you answered yes to any of my obnoxious questions above, I have a great solution for you: The Open Source Bridge event.

Oh, yes. It’s on, my friend.

I’ve been lucky enough to be involved in some of the early planning. And there’s a great team working to make things happen.

Who?

Well Reid Beels, Professor Bart Massy, Jake Kuramoto, Kelly Guimont, Adam Duvander, and of course the folks quoted above. And the team is growing, adding Ward Cunningham, Irene Schwarting, Harvey Mathews, and Clay Neal (from the City of Portland) since our initial meetings.

Now, we need some help from you.

That’s right. You. We need you.

If this sounds like an interesting concept and you’re interested in contributing some of your time, join us at CubeSpace tonight (October 30) at 7:30 PM to take part in the Town Hall.

The Town Hall will give the organizers a chance to chat with you about the proposed event. And give you a chance to voice your opinions on what you’d like to see. It will also likely give us a chance to guilt you into helping convince you to join the cause and volunteer some time.

Can’t make it? No worries. Just make sure to let one of us know how you’d like to help.

Open Source Bridge is going to be an amazing event. I can tell, already. And I’m already looking forward to seeing you there. Even though I’m not even really sure where there is yet.

At the very least, I hope to see you at CubeSpace on Thursday, October 30.

Showdango: Find and promote Webinars

I like Webinars, Webcasts, and online presentations as much as the next guy, but it’s rare that I attend one without having randomly stumbled upon the opportunity.Well, all that may change with Showdango, a Portland-based startup that aims to be your source for finding Webinars.

Showdango’s community-driven Webinar index also provides RSS feeds and the ability to automagically add an event to Google Calendar and/or iCal (the GCal and iCal links are included in the RSS feeds to boot).How did Showdango come about?

It all began with a webinar that we attended by Seth Godin. We were so inspired by Seth’s webinar that we decided to look for other webinars, and that is when, regretfully, we found out that there weren’t any good resources for webinars… until now. showdango is the world’s first webinar index, and our vision is to provide a valuable resource that anyone can use to share, view, and track webinars. We hope that you will help us spread the word about showdango.

Showdango was build by CartoSoft, a small geospatial startup based out of Portland, Oregon. The company’s mission is to extend the reach of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to a broader audience through the use of Internet Mapping Solutions.For more information, see the Showdango post on the CartoSoft blog. Or to try it for yourself, visit Showdango.

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